teaching

Should a teacher report a pupil for Extinction Rebellion activism? | Education

Counter-terror police issued guidance requiring teachers to report members of Extinction Rebellion to the authorities under the Prevent powers. The guide was recalled after the Guardian revealed its existence, but later another list emerged citing the group, as well as Greenpeace and Stop the Badger Cull. Ed Finch Teacher, Larkrise primary school, Oxford No. While I would report a pupil for extremism if I believed they had motive, intent and ability to endanger property or life, I know numerous people…

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Teachers, tell us if you think the planned pay rise is enough | Education

In light of the government announcing plans to raise salaries for teachers in England, we’d like to find out whether this measure is enough to stop teachers leaving the profession. According to government plans, the starting salary for teachers will go up from £24,373 to £26,000.Those working in outer London will get £30,000 and those in inner London will get £32,000. However salary increases for experienced teachers and school leaders will increase by just 2.5%. Ins response to the announcement,…

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Welsh parents lose opt-out for sex, relationship and religious education | Politics

Parents in Wales will soon lose the right to withdraw their children from lessons on sex and relationships or religion, provoking concern among both church groups and secular campaigners. Kirsty Williams, the Welsh education minister, confirmed the plans – part of the government’s overhaul of relationships and sexuality education (RSE) and religious education – but said they would require “careful and sensitive” implementation after the government’s public consultation revealed strong feelings. Williams said the decision “ensures that all pupils will…

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‘It happens to real people’: how to help children grasp the horror of the Holocaust | Michael Rosen | Education

As a very young child, the only inkling I had of the Holocaust was that every now and then my father would say that he’d had two uncles in France who were “there before the war and weren’t there afterwards”. I’d wonder, how could they have just disappeared? How could there only be a nothing? At weddings and wider family gatherings, we would meet his cousin Michael and later we would be told that Michael had been “put on a…

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Flawed thinking behind school isolation booths | Letters | Education

There would be an argument in favour of the use of isolation rooms or cubicles for troublesome young people in school if there was any evidence that they worked (Alarm as more schools use ‘degrading’ isolation booths, 18 January). In fact there appears to be no such evidence. The evidence that we do have is that teachers who use praised-based strategies to improve pupils’ behaviour in class experience far fewer disruptive incidents and hence less need to be punitive. Yes,…

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Schools should brace for five years of upheaval from a triumphant party with Gove at its heart | Melissa Benn | Education

The election campaign is now in a bygone decade but we are still not much clearer about what the Tories have in store for education over the next five years. The relevant section of the Conservative manifesto was, at just 646 words, deliberately vague, and seemed oriented towards perceived Labour policy weaknesses – on Ofsted and discipline – rather than on any real plans for education. Not a word on the future use of the pupil premium, nor the burden…

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Behaviour battleground: isolation booths divide opinion among teachers | Education

The use of isolation booths in state schools has become one of the most contentious issues among teachers in England, even if public concern over pupil behaviour has faded from the headlines since the 1990s. Social media has become an almost nightly battleground between teachers with conflicting views on behaviour management and the use of internal exclusion or removal rooms within schools, where disruptive pupils are taken out of class and sent to study elsewhere under supervision. What the debate…

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When school is an isolation cubicle with three toilet breaks a day | Education

Six days a week Brendan, 17, leaves at six in the morning for his job on a building site and doesn’t get home until tea time. It’s his first job and he is loving it. “I am very, very proud of him,” says his mother. But it could have turned out very differently. Brendan left his academy trust school in Normanton, West Yorkshire, without any GCSEs, having spent much of his time in an isolation cubicle, banned from talking to…

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England region plans world-first for climate change teaching | Education

A region of northern England plans to become the first place in the world to have a UN-accredited climate change teacher in every state primary and secondary school. Jamie Driscoll, the new mayor of the North of Tyne combined authority, said every school in the area would have the opportunity to train a member of staff to give lessons on global heating and the impact of the climate crisis. The region is working with the creators of EduCCate Global, a…

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Everyone welcome: inside the schools that haven’t expelled a child since 2013 | Education

Jason Thurley, headteacher at Beacon academy, near Grimsby, leans across the table explaining why yet another of his pupils was excluded before joining the school. “He’d brought in a £1 potato gun. It was at the bottom of his bag and so he goes up to his form tutor and says, ‘I don’t want to get into trouble with this, sir, can you take it?’ And he gets permanently excluded. The school said ‘we have a zero-tolerance policy on firearms’.”…

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Ofsted to bring back routine inspections for outstanding schools | Education

Outstanding schools and colleges in England are to be stripped of their exemption from regular inspections, overturning a policy introduced by the former education secretary Michael Gove. The Department for Education said that from September it plans to return to a five-year cycle of inspections for state schools rated by Ofsted as outstanding , fulfilling an election promise by the Conservatives and an earlier pledge by the education secretary, Gavin Williamson. Since 2012, schools with an outstanding rating have been…

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‘I was angry I couldn’t even say the word’: UK teens refuse to be silent about periods | Education

For most of her life, Molly Fenton had dreaded getting her period. Every month, the 17-year-old student at Llanishen high school in Cardiff would feel ashamed: uncomfortable, untouchable, unclean. “I couldn’t even say the word ‘period’ without feeling embarrassed,” she says. She is not the only girl to have felt anxious about attending school when she was menstruating. A 2019 survey by the girls’ rights charity Plan International UK found that more than half of girls aged 14-21 have missed…

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Mary Renshaw obituary | Education

A generation of south Wales social history formed the background to the life of my wife, Mary Renshaw, who has died aged 83. Born in Newport, south Wales, to Irene (nee Byrne) and Isaac Davies, she grew up in the pit village of Cwm just south of Ebbw Vale in Blaenau Gwent. Her father was a steel worker during a period when the second world war and the postwar economic boom brought prosperity to a region that had earlier felt…

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Sally Thomas obituary | Society

My friend Sally Thomas, who has died of cancer aged 60, was a pioneering lecturer in early childhood studies. I met her more than 20 years ago when she joined my MA programme at Trinity College, Carmarthen (now the University of Wales Trinity Saint David). She was a lively student, passionate about children and play. In 2000 Sally joined the staff, teaching on the new early childhood studies programmes. She was born in Sutton Coldfield (then in Warwickshire and now…

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Economists Ate My School – Why Defining Teaching as a Transaction is Destroying Our Society – Education Article

    Teaching is one of the most misunderstood interactions in the world.     Some people see it as a mere transaction, a job: you do this, I’ll pay you that.     The input is your salary. The output is learning.    These are distinctly measurable phenomena. One is calculated in dollars and cents. The other in academic outcomes, usually standardized test scores. The higher the salary, the more valued the teacher. The higher the test scores, the…

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John Penfold obituary | Education

My father, John Penfold, who has died aged 89, spent three decades training teachers in the disciplines of craft, design and technology, having first taught the subject in secondary schools. He was born in Edgware, north London, to Edwin, an accountant, and his wife, Alice (nee Rogers). After Orange Hill grammar school in Burnt Oak, he went straight to Shoreditch teacher training college, in the east of the capital, where he qualified as a design and woodwork teacher. Following two…

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