Students

Academia looks like a pint of Guinness to me – diverse below, but not at the top | Education

A lot of my work examines counterculture, race, ethnicity and religion – and challenges some western paradigms. In my early days I had to work hard to convince research directors of the value in supporting such research aims, and academic peers of the need to expand our subject discipline and research approaches. It’s tough, because I, along with other BAME academics, feel that we are fighting implicit bias on a number of levels. Firstly, how you look, linked to a…

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How crafts are fusing tradition with innovation | Education

Jayne Childs wants to change the way we think about lace. “I’m challenging the perception of lace as just something we use for curtains,” she says. “Lace doesn’t have to be fusty and dusty. It can be something we wear in the 21st century – something that’s embedded in a tradition, but also looking forward. Even if people don’t really necessarily understand what that tradition it is, they like to tap into that story.” The craft economy generates almost £3.4bn…

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Climate emergency: why education and activism go hand in hand | Education

“I turned down a six-figure training contract to focus on climate issues,” says law graduate Harry Holmes, 21, a King’s College London master’s student in environment, politics and globalisation. Worried that many years of studying environmental law or a PhD would take him well into what he calls “the climate decade”, he opted for a one-year course that allows him to continue his environmental activism while broadening his understanding of climate breakdown. He volunteers for UK Youth Climate Coalition, engaging…

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Who Will Protect My Right NOT to Pay for Your Child’s Religious Education? – Education Article

    When I was a kid back in middle school, I had a crush on this girl, let’s call her Patty.     She wasn’t the most popular or beautiful girl in class, but I kinda’ liked her.       Of course, she had no idea I was alive.     Or so I thought, until one day she walked straight up to my desk and started rubbing my hair.     I was shocked at first, but…

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‘There’s a reason for doing something so difficult’: what to expect from a PhD | Education

A PhD is not just three years of intense study, but something that will affect your whole life. “It is a long project that is very different to any academic work you’ll have done before,” says Alicia Peña Bizama, Life Tools programme manager at the University of Reading. Psychological problems aren’t uncommon. The risks of developing common psychiatric disorders is very high, so it’s no surprise that evasion rates are also high. Above all, says NUS postgraduate representative David Evans,…

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Minister criticises lack of senior black UK academics | Education

The universities minister has criticised UK higher education institutions for their failure to recruit and promote black and minority ethnic academics, after figures showed that no black staff were employed at the most senior levels. Chris Skidmore, higher education minister for England, said it was unacceptable that the number of black academics in the most senior leadership roles had fallen from an estimated five in 2017-18 to possibly zero in the last academic year. According to figures published by the…

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Trump Administration’s “Junk Food Loophole” is Symptomatic of School Privatization – Education Article

  Who wants children to eat more junk food?     Apparently the Trump administration does.     This seemed to be the Department of Agriculture’s concern when it announced plans last week to further reduce regulations for healthy meals at the nation’s public schools.   The Department’s new scheme would change the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 to include what critics call a “junk food loophole” in meals offered at public schools – usually breakfasts and lunches.  …

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Senior UK academics protest over pay and working conditions | Education

Senior academics are refusing to act as external examiners – a vital part of higher education assessments – in protest at pay and working conditions in UK universities, and are urging colleagues to join them, potentially disrupting this year’s results for students. British universities rely on external examiners to independently validate the results of undergraduate and postgraduate courses, meaning that mass resignations would cause headaches for universities in the setting and marking of exams. A letter to the Guardian signed…

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Thousands of UK academics ‘treated as second-class citizens’ | Education

Thousands of academic staff at British universities are being treated as second-class citizens on precarious contracts, says a report highlighting the “alarming rise of mass casualised labour” in higher education. The report by the University and College Union claims institutions have created a pool of low-paid staff to teach undergraduates, conduct research and work in libraries, despite having advanced postgraduate or other academic qualifications. It calls on the Office for Students, the higher education regulator in England, to require each…

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Free period products to be available in schools and colleges in England | Education

Tampons, sanitary pads and other period products will be made freely available to all state schools and colleges in England starting next week, with the launch of a scheme funded by the Department for Education. The scheme follows the government’s commitment last year to pay for sanitary products for primary and secondary schools, in an effort to tackle “period poverty”, which can cause girls from low-income families to missschool. “We know that it is not easy for everyone to access…

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Third of non-EU university students in UK come from China | Education

The number of students from China at British universities increased again last year, with the latest figures showing that recruitment of Chinese students outstripped those from other countries. The Higher Education Statistics Agency’s breakdown of students in UK higher education last year showed that the number of students from China rose above 120,000 for the first time, accounting for more than one in every three non-EU students. While the number of new students coming from EU countries rose by 2%…

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Record numbers of state school pupils offered Oxford places | Education

State school pupils have won nearly 70% of Oxford University’s undergraduate places next year, a record level that represents a remarkable turnaround in the university’s intake over the last five years. Oxford announced that 69% of the offers it made this week were to British students from state schools or colleges for courses starting in October 2020, of a total of 3,909 sent to British and international applicants. Five years ago, state school applicants to Oxford received just 56% of…

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Boris Johnson says the Erasmus scheme isn’t under threat. Do you trust him? | Layla Moran | Education

I never thought I’d see a student exchange programme trend on Twitter. People have told stories of studying and working abroad through Erasmus, sharing tales of friendships built, skills learned, and lives changed. Why? Because MPs voted against my amendment to keep the UK in Erasmus after the Brexit transition period. And people are angry. The benefits of Erasmus are sobvious to the thousands of people who take part in the programme. Each year, more than 17,000 students at UK…

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AstroTurf Alert: National Parents Union is Thinly Veiled Union Busting Backed by Billionaire Cash – Education Article

 How do you do something disgusting without hurting your image?     If you’re the Walton Family, you hide behind a mask.     That’s what their latest AstroTurf front group is – the so-called National Parents Union (NPU).     It’s a way to bust teachers unions, destroy public schools and profit off of students behind the guise of a friendly parents organization.     Oh, it’s all funded with oodles of cash from the Walton family and other…

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Sussex University offers students up to £100 for strike distress | Education

The University of Sussex is offering students up to £100 if they suffered “distress and inconvenience” during recent strikes, becoming the first British university to give compensation to students in the middle of industrial action. The move is a sign of the increasing efforts by universities to resolve student complaints swiftly and head off action through the courts or regulators that could lead to more damaging penalties. Sussex launched its “industrial action ex gratia scheme” this week, with an email…

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‘How can we compete with Google?’: the battle to train quantum coders | Education

There is a laboratory deep within University College London (UCL) that looks like a cross between a rebel base in Star Wars and a scene imagined by Jules Verne. Hidden within the miles of cables, blinking electronic equipment and screens is a gold-coloured contraption known as a dilution refrigerator. Its job is to chill the highly sensitive equipment needed to build a quantum computer to close to absolute zero, the coldest temperature in the known universe. Standing around the refrigerator…

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