Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Welcome to Episode 469 of the Moving at the Speed of Creativity podcast from January 18, 2020, a show by Dr. Wesley Fryer (@wfryer) focusing on digital creativity, media literacy, digital literacy, digital citizenship, instructional technology integration and engaged learning both inside and outside the classroom. This episode features a conversation with 3rd grade teacher Shelly Fryer (@sfryer) about the second “Immersion Day” at Casady School in Oklahoma City. Immersion Days are half-days for students which focus on a special…

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UK universities issue health warnings over travel to China | Education

UK universities with links to China have issued warnings to staff and students travelling to and from areas affected by the coronavirus, urging anyone with symptoms to seek medical advice. With concern growing about the spread of the virus, universities in the UK are keeping a check on staff who have recently returned from Wuhan, the city at the centre of the outbreak, as well as Chinese students who come from affected areas, many of whom will be concerned about…

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‘People can’t learn about treatments they need’: why open access to medical research matters | Education

In December 2002, a Belfast teenager made world headlines after his father, Don Simms, won him the legal right to access an experimental drug. Jonathan Simms had been diagnosed with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a cruel and fatal neurodegenerative condition that gives sufferers an average of one year to live. After receiving the drug pentosan polysulfate, Jonathan lived for another 10 years, defying all medical expectations. The court ruling made medical history: until that point the drug had only ever…

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Slip-up leaves priests rolling in the aisles | Brief letters | Education

We applaud the rise in state-sector intake across Oxford University and are glad to see individual colleges praised (Report, 16 January). Perhaps Mansfield College deserves a mention. In a quietly radical fashion, we have led the way in Oxford access for 20 years. Our state intake has been over 80% for 10 years and over 90% since 2016. And more than 90% of our state-sector intake this year is from non-selective schools – a meaningful statistic for Oxford University.Lucinda RumseySenior…

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Universities must overhaul the toxic working culture for academic researchers | Anton Muscatelli | Education

Academic research is an exciting, creative and varied endeavour, yet there is growing evidence that our culture has developed unhealthy levels of anxiety and stress. As the UK increases research and development spending – all the more important after Brexit – we will see much-needed growth in the number and significance of researchers. Yet it’s clear that we also need to make changes to their working conditions. This is underscored by a new survey from research funder Wellcome, which says…

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‘How can we compete with Google?’: the battle to train quantum coders | Education

There is a laboratory deep within University College London (UCL) that looks like a cross between a rebel base in Star Wars and a scene imagined by Jules Verne. Hidden within the miles of cables, blinking electronic equipment and screens is a gold-coloured contraption known as a dilution refrigerator. Its job is to chill the highly sensitive equipment needed to build a quantum computer to close to absolute zero, the coldest temperature in the known universe. Standing around the refrigerator…

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‘Guys ask for more money’: why female-led startups underperform | Education

The first time Olivia Champion pitched a business idea based on her academic research was so disheartening she nearly gave up. The 10-strong panel she faced were all men, bar a few women responsible for administration and taking minutes. Their first question was: “Why are you here?” “It took the wind out of my sails immediately,” she says. “I thought, ‘Blimey. This is going badly.’” She had been convinced her idea was good, but after that rejection she began to…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Today I taught a lesson in which I shared a 4.5 minute excerpt of an amazing 55 minute NASA podcast, featuring an April 2019 interview with Dr. Harrison Schmitt, the Apollo 17 lunar module pilot and the only geologist to walk on the Moon to date! In this post, I’ll share my workflow and steps I followed to create this audio media collage, shared as a video on YouTube. Before sharing my workflow, I’ll address copyright / intellectual property issues.…

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Duolingo sparks Gaelic boom as young Scots shrug off ‘cringe’ factor | Education

Almost double the number of people in Scotland who already speak Scottish Gaelic have signed up to learn the language on the popular free platform Duolingo in over a month, concluding a proliferation in courses, prizes and performance in Gaelic and Scots during 2019, as younger people in particular shrug off the “cultural cringe” associated with speaking indigenous languages. The Duolingo course, which was launched just before St Andrew’s Day on 30 November and looks likely to be the company’s…

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Is modafinil safe in the long term? | Education

Modafinil has emerged as the crown prince of smart drugs, that seductive group of pharmaceutical friends that promise enhanced memory, motivation, and an unrelenting ability to focus, all for hours at a time. In the absence of long-term data, the media, particularly the student media, has tended to be relaxed about potential side-effects. The Oxford Tab, for example, simply shrugs: Who cares? The novelist MJ Hyland, who suffers from multiple sclerosis, wrote a paean to the drug in the Guardian…

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‘Women have been woefully neglected’: does medical science have a gender problem? | Education

When Lynn Enright had a hysteroscopy to examine the inside of the womb, her searing pain was dismissed by medical professionals. She finally understood why when she started working on her book on female anatomy, Vagina: A Re-education. She was looking for research on pain and women’s health, only to be shocked by how little data she found. It wasn’t just the topic of pain that was poorly researched. The lack of evidence was a problem she encountered time and…

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Can you boost your brain power by making yourself ambidextrous? | Education

Could learning to write with both hands make your brain sharper and more speedy? Could training schoolchildren to use their non-dominant hands improve their exam results? Such claims have been popular for more than a century. Handedness – the preference for using one hand over another – is one of the deepest mysteries of neuroscience. We still know very little about what being left- or right-handed means for brain function, or about what effects learning to become ambidextrous might have.…

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Resourceaholic: 5 Maths Gems #113 – Education Article

Welcome to my 113th gems post. This is where I share some of the latest news, ideas and resources for maths teachers. 1. L Shapes In MathsPad’s July update they shared a free interactive tool for finding missing sides of L-shapes. This can be used to demonstrate how the vertical lines on one side of the shape match the total length on the other side and to help pupils separate horizontal and vertical measures when finding missing lengths. There are accompanying…

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Teacher rebellion: How Mr Jones gave up his job to fight the climate crisis | Education

Tim Jones had just landed a job as an RE teacher at a secondary school in Greenwich when he stumbled on Extinction Rebellion. Not long before, he had been seeing a counsellor for feelings of helplessness and depression about the ecosystem and how schools fed into the planet’s problems. “At that point I was at my most depressed,” he says. “It was eco-anxiety. I’d started a new job at a good school with good people, but the system was just…

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People listen to Greta Thunberg because of her creativity, not just her science | Lisette Johnston | Education

Blue Planet, Extinction Rebellion and Greta Thunberg are all household names bringing information about serious environmental issues to the masses. They’ve helped green issues shoot up the agenda for this year’s general election, with a poll last month revealing that more than half of voters said that the climate emergency would influence how they cast their vote. If it wasn’t for the media these scientific messages wouldn’t be heard or understood by millions of people. And Greta Thunberg’s extraordinary global…

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Does music really help you concentrate? | Education

Many people listen to music while they’re carrying out a task, whether they’re studying for an exam, driving a vehicle or even reading a book. Many of these people argue that background music helps them focus. Why, though? When you think about it, that doesn’t make much sense. Why would having two things to concentrate on make you more focused, not less? Some people even go so far as to say that not having music on is more distracting. So…

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