Research

Cambridge University assigns white academic to look at slavery links | Education

The equal rights campaigner and former Labour politician Trevor Phillips has criticised the University of Cambridge’s “bizarre” decision to appoint a white academic as head of a study into the institution’s historical links with slavery. Prof Martin Millett of Fitzwilliam College is to oversee the two-year research project, which will investigate ways in which the university “contributed to or benefited from the Atlantic slave trade and other forms of coerced labour during the colonial era” in an effort to “acknowledge…

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Help! I’m Trying to Teach My 9-Month-Old How to Crawl and it isn’t Working. – Education Rickshaw – Education Article

I have a 9-month-old daughter who still cannot crawl. I’ve tried having her build up her strength through various leg and abdominal exercises. I’ve shown her interactive diagrams and YouTube videos of babies crawling, and I’ve read her the definition of crawling from the dictionary. I’ve modeled the correct way to crawl so many times I’m wearing holes in the knees of my jeans. The doctor told me that this is totally normal and not to worry, but today when…

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Interview: Gita Ramjee | Education

Months have passed, but Professor Gita Ramjee still recoils at the memory of events that came close to robbing South Africa of one of its top scientists. “There came a point when I thought: is it worth my while? I have dedicated my life to finding an HIV prevention option for the women of Africa, and these recent attempts to tarnish my efforts have been very demotivating.” It is fitting that we meet on a day when freak waves and…

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Postgraduate students urge funders to extend grants over coronavirus | Education

PhD and master’s students have signed an open letter asking to be given extensions to their funding by research councils so they can finish work disrupted by the coronavirus. The letter, which has more than 1,000 signatories across UK universities, asks for research councils to urgently publish a plan outlining additional financial support for all postgraduate students. Many postgraduate students are currently unable to continue their research projects and theses because fieldwork has been halted and university labs and libraries…

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I’m a PhD student and I’m worried by my university’s coronavirus approach | Jafia Naftali Camara | Education

On 11 March, the World Health Organisation declared coronavirus to be a pandemic. On 12 March, at the University of Bristol, where I conduct my research, news broke that a student had tested positive for coronavirus after returning home from abroad. Despite this, the university is still open. Although most courses have moved online, lots of students have remained on site and can still use campus facilities such as the gym. I’m finding the university’s response unclear, confusing, and perhaps…

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Academics refused permanent UK visas because of field trips abroad | Education

When Dr Nazia Hussein spent six months researching class and gender identity in Bangladesh for her PhD at Warwick University in 2009, she had no idea that, a decade later, the Home Office would use this to refuse her application for permanent residency. Hussein, a Bangladeshi expert on gender, race and religion, now a lecturer at the University of Bristol, was “absolutely shocked” when her application for indefinite leave to remain (ILR) was rejected last year on the grounds that…

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‘Naked intimidation’: how universities silence academics on social media | Education

When Cardiff University PhD student Grace Krause began getting headaches and back pain after staring at a computer screen for days on end, she decided to speak out online. “Staff are marking hundreds of essays in an impossibly short time. It is exhausting. Everyone is in crisis mode. Stressed, moody, morose, everyone feels like they’re drowning,” she wrote on Twitter. The tweet came after a colleague had killed himself on campus and the inquest cited workload as a factor. Within…

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Farting fish fingered | Education

If it seems bizarre that serious scientists in Scotland should publish a study of farting in herrings, how improbable is it that they were almost beaten into print by a team of Swedish researchers who had discovered the same phenomenon? But that’s great minds for you. Bob Batty, of the Scottish Association for Marine Science, was certainly surprised when he made the discovery with two Canadian fellow researchers, Ben Wilson, of the University of British Columbia, and Larry Dill, of…

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The Ongoing Study of How and When Teachers Should Praise Students – Education Article

    Should teachers praise their students?     It’s a simple question with a multiplicity of answers.     A 2020 study published in the journal Educational Psychology concludes that teachers who use praise see a 30% increase in good behavior from their classes.     Meanwhile, reprimands actually increase misbehavior and unwillingness to comply with instruction.     Researches suggest a 3:1 or 4:1 praise-to-reprimand ratio. So for every one reprimand, a teacher should provide three or four…

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Top geneticist ‘should resign’ over his team’s laboratory fraud | Education

A row over scientific fraud at the highest level of British academia has led to calls for one of the country’s leading geneticists and highest-paid university chiefs to leave his posts. David Latchman, professor of genetics at University College London and master of Birkbeck, University of London – a post that earns him £380,000 a year – has angered senior academics by presiding over a laboratory that published fraudulent research, mostly on genetics and heart disease, for more than a…

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Put More Movement in Your Middle Grades Lessons – Education Article

A MiddleWeb Blog My Teaching Secret I have a teaching secret. Not the good type, like a trick or tip to make sure every lesson is a success…but the kind I’m NOT proud of. Here it is: Despite all the writing and speaking I do about making learning student-focused, participatory, and engaging, deep down what I really crave is a compliant, calm, predictable classroom. The truth is that I feel the most comfortable in the driver’s seat of learning –…

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‘People can’t learn about treatments they need’: why open access to medical research matters | Education

In December 2002, a Belfast teenager made world headlines after his father, Don Simms, won him the legal right to access an experimental drug. Jonathan Simms had been diagnosed with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a cruel and fatal neurodegenerative condition that gives sufferers an average of one year to live. After receiving the drug pentosan polysulfate, Jonathan lived for another 10 years, defying all medical expectations. The court ruling made medical history: until that point the drug had only ever…

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It’s NOT About Google (Part 3) – SULS046 – Education Article

I love Google tools, but it’s NOT about Google! It’s about how we can use these tools to create dynamic learning experiences for our students. In this 4-part podcast series on Dynamic Learning with Google, Kasey shares all her favorite lesson ideas! In part three, Kasey explains how we can go BEYOND our curriculum and help students discover their passions, and how we can use Google tools to support this strategy! BONUS: Get the Dynamic Learning with Google Toolkit to…

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Research demonstrates how the use of bad language can alter our behaviour | Education

I have a friend who can’t say “fuck”. She never has been able to and shakes her head helplessly when teased and dared to give it a go. She’s not a prude. But she has such a strong reaction to the word that she cannot bring herself to utter it. Using the f-word in the first sentence of this article wasn’t done for gratuitous effect. But how did you react to reading it? Would it have been more agreeable to…

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Universities must overhaul the toxic working culture for academic researchers | Anton Muscatelli | Education

Academic research is an exciting, creative and varied endeavour, yet there is growing evidence that our culture has developed unhealthy levels of anxiety and stress. As the UK increases research and development spending – all the more important after Brexit – we will see much-needed growth in the number and significance of researchers. Yet it’s clear that we also need to make changes to their working conditions. This is underscored by a new survey from research funder Wellcome, which says…

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‘How can we compete with Google?’: the battle to train quantum coders | Education

There is a laboratory deep within University College London (UCL) that looks like a cross between a rebel base in Star Wars and a scene imagined by Jules Verne. Hidden within the miles of cables, blinking electronic equipment and screens is a gold-coloured contraption known as a dilution refrigerator. Its job is to chill the highly sensitive equipment needed to build a quantum computer to close to absolute zero, the coldest temperature in the known universe. Standing around the refrigerator…

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