Marcia Worrell obituary | Psychology

My friend, Marcia Worrell, who has died suddenly aged 54, forged a path in becoming one of a small group of black female professors of psychology. All Marcia’s scholarly work evolved from her long-held desire to call out injustice and oppression. Those who knew her cherished her kindness, warmth and energy. Marcia was born and grew up in north London, the daughter of Odella (nee Patterson), a nurse, and Ulric Worrell, a carpenter and joiner, and the sister of Ian…

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Eva Wickham obituary | Teaching

My wife, Eva Wickham, who has died aged 76, worked for the Inner London Education Authority in Lambeth as an educational psychologist for two decades from 1971. When Ilea was abolished in 1990, she moved to Wandsworth’s educational psychology service, where she remained until her retirement in 2006. She had a deep aversion to doing nothing and in retirement she soon found herself chairing the governing body of a local primary school. Throughout her adult life Eva was involved in…

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The Ongoing Study of How and When Teachers Should Praise Students – Education Article

    Should teachers praise their students?     It’s a simple question with a multiplicity of answers.     A 2020 study published in the journal Educational Psychology concludes that teachers who use praise see a 30% increase in good behavior from their classes.     Meanwhile, reprimands actually increase misbehavior and unwillingness to comply with instruction.     Researches suggest a 3:1 or 4:1 praise-to-reprimand ratio. So for every one reprimand, a teacher should provide three or four…

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Research demonstrates how the use of bad language can alter our behaviour | Education

I have a friend who can’t say “fuck”. She never has been able to and shakes her head helplessly when teased and dared to give it a go. She’s not a prude. But she has such a strong reaction to the word that she cannot bring herself to utter it. Using the f-word in the first sentence of this article wasn’t done for gratuitous effect. But how did you react to reading it? Would it have been more agreeable to…

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What do teachers need to know about Cognitive Load Theory? – David Didau – Education Article

I’ve come to the conclusion Sweller’s Cognitive Load Theory is the single most important thing for teachers to know https://t.co/MkJJLruR8g — Dylan Wiliam (@dylanwiliam) January 26, 2017 What do teachers need to know about Cognitive Load Theory? The short answer is, not that much. There’s an awful that’s been written and said about Cognitive Load Theory (CTL) in recent years and most of it is wholly unnecessary for teachers to know about. At it’s heart, the theory relies on a…

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Is misused neuroscience defining early years and child protection policy? | Education

“Neuroscience can now explain why early conditions are so crucial,” wrote Graham Allen and Iain Duncan Smith in their 2010 collaboration, Early Intervention: Good Parents, Great Kids, Better Citizens. “The more positive stimuli a baby is given, the more brain cells and synapses it will be able to develop.”  Neuroscience is huge in early years policy. This week, in what’s been characterised as the largest shake-up of family law in a generation, the 26-week time limit for adoption proceedings has…

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If you can’t imagine things, how can you learn? | Education

Never underestimate the power of visualisation. It may sound like a self-help mantra, but a growing body of evidence shows that mental imagery can accelerate learning and improve performance of all sorts of skills. For athletes and musicians, “going through the motions,” or mentally rehearsing the movements in the mind, is just as effective as physical training, and motor imagery can also help stroke patients regain function of their paralysed limbs. For most of us, visual imagery is essential for…

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Why boarding schools produce bad leaders | Education

In Britain, the link between private boarding education and leadership is gold-plated. If their parents can afford it, children are sent away from home to walk a well-trodden path that leads straight from boarding school through Oxbridge to high office in institutions such as the judiciary, the army, the City and, especially, government. Our prime minister was only seven when he was sent away to board at Heatherdown preparatory school in Berkshire. Like so many of the men who hold…

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How physical exercise makes your brain work better | Education

The brain is often described as being “like a muscle”. It’s a comparison that props up the brain training industry and keeps school children hunched over desks. We judge literacy and numeracy exercises as more beneficial for your brain than running, playing and learning on the move. But the brain-as-muscle analogy doesn’t quite work. To build up your biceps you can’t avoid flexing them. When it comes to your brain, an oblique approach can be surprisingly effective. In particular, working…

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The secret to a high salary? Emotional intelligence | Guardian Careers

While IQ remains a very strong predictor of career success, our research suggests that people with high emotional intelligence are more likely to have higher wages. The study, published in the Journal of Vocational Behaviour in August 2017, tested US university students for emotional intelligence, or EI, during their studies – and then looked at their career trajectory over the course of 10 years. The results showed us that students who scored highly for EI went on to have better…

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Six Problems with a Growth Mindset in Education – Education Article

  Sometimes the truth is not enough.   Especially if you misunderstand its meaning.   That seems to be the main problem with a growth mindset.   It’s one of the trendiest concepts in education today, and – though it’s based on an authentic insight into how kids learn – it’s been shackled and monetized into an excuse to support a sterile status quo.   The basic idea goes like this: academic ability isn’t something students have or do not…

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Standardized Tests Are Not Objective Measures of Anything – Education Article

 When it comes to standardized tests, most people are blinded by science.   Or at least the appearance of science.   Because there is little about these assessments that is scientific, factual or unbiased.   And that has real world implications when it comes to education policy.   First of all, the federal government requires that all public school children take these assessments in 3-8th grade and once in high school. Second, many states require teachers be evaluated by their…

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Geoff White obituary | Education

In 1985 the work research unit of the Department of Employment was disbanded and my father, Geoff White, stepped down after five years as director. A colleague wrote: “It is not often that one person can make a national and international contribution to such a worthy cause; the quality of working life in the UK will always be linked with the name of Geoff White.” Geoff, who has died aged 93, was an occupational psychologist, elected a fellow of the…

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4 Things Teachers Need To Do To Communicate Better – Education Article

Reading Time: 3 minutes How can we improve our communication skills? The ability to communicate effectively is possibly the most important characteristic of a successful teacher. Communication, however, goes far beyond what you say. Communication is how you say it, when you say it, how often you say it, who you say it to and possibly most importantly what your actions are saying. Here are 4 things you can do with your class to create the best environment for learning. 1.…

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Let me into your home: artist Lauren McCarthy on becoming Alexa for a day | Art and design

In a gallery in downtown Manhattan, people are huddling around four laptops, taking turns to control the apartments of 14 complete strangers. They watch via live video feeds, and respond whenever the residents ask “Someone” to help them. They switch the lights on and off, boil the kettle, put some music on – whatever they can do to oblige. The project, called Someone, is the latest in a series exploring our ever more complicated relationship with technology. It’s by the…

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