5 Things Teachers Don’t Want to Hear During Summer – Education Article

The school year is exhausting. Teachers put so much effort into their day to day interactions with students, but also into their PLCs, curriculum, and interactions with administration and parents. When summer break finally rolls around, there are some things we simply do not want to hear until August. “You’re so lucky to ______” This must be the top statement teachers consistently hear. “You’re so lucky to get paid for not working all summer,” or “you’re so lucky to have…

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Is it time to focus on national college access instead of free college? – Education Article

  There’s a national conversation about “free” college taking place in statehouses and dining rooms across America. There are many students who want to attend college, but costs get in the way. Currently, only 47 percent of U.S. adults aged 24 to 64 have a college degree. Michigan lags a bit further behind at 45 percent. By comparison, 57 percent of our neighbors in Canada and 51 percent of adults in Japan have a college degree, according to the National Center…

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Daughters in STEM — This is how we can get girls into science – Education Article

  A few nights ago, I took my 7-year-old daughter out for dinner at our favorite Mediterranean restaurant. After examining the menu, we decided to order a whole sea bass to split among us. It’s become something of a tradition to order an entire fish when we go to this restaurant. It’s not just because we love seafood (and we do). It’s because I love watching my daughter turn dinner into an experiment. She’ll dissect the fish, examine its bones…

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Three ways to help teachers support our youngest learners – Education Article

  Despite the gridlock that has become synonymous with the nation’s capital, in 2008 Washington, D.C., enacted something groundbreaking. It rolled out universal free access to preschool and pre-k across the city. Just over a decade later, the district offers a roadmap and improvement model for other cities looking to provide universal early childhood access to more families. Here are three key lessons: Lesson 1: Access to early childhood education sets students on a strong learning path. The research is…

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‘Tests may be unbiased, but the system is not’ – Education Article

  Every spring, New York City’s eight specialized high schools release admissions results, and every spring there’s an uproar over the paucity of black and brown students admitted. This year, one of those schools — Stuyvesant High School — only accepted seven black students for its 895 spots. Five years ago, Stuyvesant admitted five black students. Elected officials, policymakers and community members are outraged when these numbers are printed in the news, but year after year we engage in vehement…

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What Teacher Choice in PD Should Look Like – Education Article

We all know how it feels to attend a half-hearted PD session we don’t think will be useful in our classrooms. Maybe it’s the content that feels irrelevant or the structure of the session. Whatever the cause, teachers are tired of attending PD that doesn’t fit our personal needs or the needs of our school community. So, what should be done about it? Betsy DeVos has recently stated she supports Trump’s proposed budget that includes cutting the $2.35 billion Title…

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If colleges want a diverse campus they need to amend admissions policies – Education Article

For those who seek higher education, access to a college is no longer an insurmountable problem. With more than 5,000 colleges and universities dotted across the United States, and the availability of online and distance learning, more students can find their way into a college classroom than ever before. Yet close inspection reveals that there is a big assumption in our everyday thinking about higher education that is riddled with faults: the idea that individuals choose the colleges they attend.…

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Students get too little public service care from too many people – Education Article

Approximately five million students who are served by public care agencies have multiple official adults in their lives — judges, lawyers, therapists, volunteers, teachers, counselors, case managers, social workers and more — people paid to support them when they experience significant life circumstances like homelessness, foster care or incarceration.   That five million does not include those students who experience instability resulting from uncounted experiences like evictions, parental arrests, prolonged family medical crises, migrant work and other major life disruptions.…

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Students need a boost in wealth more than a boost in SAT scores – Education Article

Standardized tests that are used for the purposes of college admissions don’t predict for college success very well. Scores on the widely used SAT and ACT predict adequately only for grades earned in a student’s first year in college. And those scores are worse predictors for black and brown students. On the other hand, scores from the SAT and ACT tests are good proxies for the amount of wealth students are born into. Income tracks with test performance. The more…

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A Delusional Parent Tried to Sue Me – Education Article

Teachers are well versed in the helicopter parent. The helicopter parent hovers at all times picking at small things, meddling, and is generally over-involved. They will usually try to solve each and every small problem their kid encounters by asking the teacher to get involved or blaming the problem on the teacher. This new type of parent, however, is worse. The new parent bully is delusional and absent. The delusional parent takes a perfectly normal situation and spins it in…

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U.S. colleges shut out international students with restrictive financial aid – Education Article

  Top U.S. colleges pride themselves on building global communities. Admissions officers travel the world to tout the diverse international perspectives on campus; college brochures enumerate the countries that students hail from. But restrictive financial-aid policies at U.S. colleges shut out very large numbers of international applicants. I got my first inside look at international admissions when I took a job helping talented Ukrainian students from poor families apply to U.S. colleges. The nonprofit I joined worked with some of…

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Activists in education are needed now more than ever – Education Article

The year: 1980 Activists in education are needed now more than ever. I was thirteen years old when I saw this coming. A smug ex-actor with Brylcreemed hair dropped a condescending line in a presidential debate. That isn’t a big deal by itself, especially when you consider how low the presidential decency bar currently is. But at the time, about four decades ago, I understood what was happening. In politics, substance and representation (moral obligation) was losing to style (sponsored…

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On Mother’s Day, skip the flowers and invest in mothers – Education Article

Elsie Mae Boyd worked as a domestic worker, cleaning white people’s houses, through the 1950s and ’60s in Pittsburgh. When I was born in 1970, my biological mother struggled to take care of me so Elsie — the woman I call Mom — informally adopted my older brother and me, with my younger brother joining us a few years later. Mom only had an eighth-grade education, so to make money, she and her daughter Mary “watched,” aka took in or…

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Why teachers must discuss gun violence in classrooms – Education Article

As a professor of education, I’m known for changing the conversation to what’s on my students’ minds.   So, even though there’s little I’d want to discuss less than guns, I wrapped up my final week of class recently by shifting the conversation once again amid a deadly shooting at a California synagogue and a second shooting at a large university in North Carolina. (Unfortunately, another fatal shooting, in a Colorado school, occurred soon after.) We should not need to talk…

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Debt forgiveness programs in Michigan to help college students in debt – Education Article

From Left to Right: Russell Kavalhuna, president of Henry Ford College, Ora Hirsch Pescovitz, president of Oakland University, M. Roy Wilson, president of Wayne State University, Sandy Baruah, president and CEO of the Chamber and Brandy Johnson, advisor, Office of the Governor – Michigan announce a new initiative to remove college debts at gathering hosted by the Lumina Foundation in Detroit Michigan on April 30, 2019. Andre Perry/The Hechinger Report Many of us have been there. We didn’t pay a…

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Students are supposed to read The Scarlet Letter, not wear it – Education Article

At the start of the 2018-19 school year, every student at Mingus Union High School in Cottonwood, Ariz. was issued a color-coded ID badge.* In the past, red badges denoted a student’s rank as an underclassman. Juniors and seniors wore gray badges. Beyond distinguishing between older and younger students, color coding provided a sense of progression, rank and seniority. However, last year the school decided to take a different direction in categorizing students. Mingus Union forced academically underperforming students to…

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