Mental Health

Schools ‘converting toilet blocks into isolation booths’ | Education

Schools are converting toilet blocks and classrooms to build isolation booths to accommodate “disruptive” children, the children’s commissioner has said, as campaigners warn that excessive use of the practice could be putting young people’s mental health at risk. Anne Longfield said she had heard “horror stories” about children’s experiences in isolation booths – spaces in which pupils sit in silence for hours as punishment for breaking school rules and disruptive behaviour. Some pupils told her they had been put in…

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‘Every moment here is magical’: Essex school wins dementia award | Education

A primary school in Essex has won a national dementia award for an innovative intergenerational project, which brings together isolated older adults and children in need of additional support with extraordinary results. The project at Downshall primary school in Ilford is one of a growing number of intergenerational initiatives in the UK designed to bring benefits to both old and young, while helping to fill the gaps left by cuts to local community support services. At Downshall, older adults experiencing…

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In the 2020s universities need to step up as a central pillar of civil society | Jonathan Wolff | Education

Higher education review of the decade? Hmm. The 2010s will be remembered by me as the age of the academic league table. Global, local, research, teaching, or knowledge exchange; official, unofficial, by newspaper or blogger. Give academics a new league table performance indicator, and we’ll go a-chasing, with all the dignity of a soap opera character at the Boxing Day sales. And what is in store for the 2020s? Brexit planning suggests universities will be keener still to inch up…

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Olive Keidan obituary | Education

My mother, Olive Keidan, who has died aged 95, was a psychiatric social worker who became a lecturer in social administration at Liverpool and Bangor universities. She was born in Liverpool to Alice Walters and her Scottish husband, Thomas Tulloch, an engineer. After attending Holly Lodge school in Liverpool she trained in social work at Liverpool University (1942-44), then worked for the next two decades as an evacuation welfare officer, maternity and child welfare almoner, tutor, and a psychiatric social…

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Educators Flexed Their Muscles in 2019, Look Forward to 2020 – Education Article

In 2019, the news generally got better for educators and students. Across the U.S., educator walkouts have led to increased funding for public schools, more support for teachers and education support professionals, and more attention to the needs of students. Today, we know more than ever about the effects of childhood trauma and racial bias on learning—and that’s a good thing. As the end of the calendar year approaches, let’s take a look at eight positive education trends of 2019 that we…

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‘Students have a bad name’: how cities are healing the town v gown divide | Education

Wild parties, chaotic flatshares and heavy drinking are viewed with affection as the youthful hijinks associated with university life – but not by everyone. With some universities rapidly expanding following the removal of the student numbers cap, these behaviours are fuelling a growing divide between students and their local communities. The past year has seen reports describe how residents are “fed up” with noisy student parties in Bristol, how student housing is “destroying the local community” in Brighton and Liverpool,…

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British girls have finally made the global top table … for fear of failure. How terrifying | Laura McInerney | Education

Last year, in randomly selected school halls across the country, Britain pitted its 15-year-olds in an academic competition of wits against children from 79 other countries. The Pisa (Programme for International Student Assessment) tests have taken place across the globe every three years since 2000, and a country’s score is often used to boast about its smartness (or otherwise). The results this year showed the United Kingdom has finally made it into the top five. But our standout statistic isn’t…

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Next NHS staff shortages will include radiographers, as courses close | Education

Radiography and nursing degree courses may be at risk of closure, academics are warning – at a time when the NHS is wrestling with a recruitment crisis. The Council of Deans of Health has now drawn up an “at risk” list of university courses struggling to attract and retain enough students following the removal of the student bursary in 2017. The courses include: radiography, mental health nursing, learning disability nursing, podiatry and prosthetics. The list also includes orthotics, which is…

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Parents take legal action over pupils labelled as truants | Education

Families with children who are labelled “school refusers” are planning to take legal action against the government to challenge rules on truancy that allow them to be fined and prosecuted. A group of parents, working with lawyers, wants a judicial review of the school attendance regulations that label their children as “truants”. The families say the severe anxiety that their children suffer from should be treated as a mental health issue, not an attendance one. In many cases, the pupils…

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How anxiety scrambles your brain and makes it hard to learn | Education

Olivia admits she’s always been a worrier – but when she started university, her anxiety steadily began to build. One day she was simply too frightened to leave the house. For two weeks she was stuck indoors, before she was diagnosed with generalised anxiety disorder and began to get the help she needed. With support from her GP and university wellbeing service, and courses of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), she was able to stick with her university course and to…

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Secret Teacher: Class, I wish I’d told you the truth about my mental health | Teacher Network

Last year, I quit teaching. I had completed my NQT induction, and despite the years of self-doubt and tears I’d finally come to recognise that I was a competent teacher, and had started to believe my positive feedback. I had also come to realise, however, that teaching was an unhealthy career choice for me. I am a perfectionist – or now, I hope, a recovering perfectionist – who is prone to anxiety. Unfortunately, I could not reconcile these aspects of…

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GCSE results day 2019: increase in top grades – live | Education

Amy Walker has been speaking to delighted pupils at a voluntary aided King David High School in Liverpool – a Jewish school that admits children from 11 to 18 of all faiths. Ben Franks, 16, is among those now in the queue to register for the school’s sixth form after receiving GCSE grades including an 8 (equivalent to an A*), two 7s (A) and three 6s (B). Revising “got really weird at one point,” he said. “I basically developed a…

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Out of control: is too much work the real cause of burnout? | Life and style

Carolyn King reached a crossroads moment in her life, ironically, while negotiating a roundabout on the way to work. She hated her job, but had always been able to push through the Sunday night dread to turn up on time. Yet on this particular Monday morning, almost two years ago, King couldn’t exit the roundabout. “It was like I was possessed, my body was telling me not to go to work,” she says. “Instead, I turned around and drove to…

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Secret Teacher: I hated teaching – until I realised my school was the problem | Teacher Network

Not so long ago, I was ready to quit teaching. Now, I’ve got my sights on leadership. The difference is my headteacher. Under my previous head, I got the point where I couldn’t go on. I was signed off work with anxiety and stress. At school, we’d been under intense pressure to get more children to expected levels to show the school was improving – and were always on edge thanks to drop-in observations. As a member of the school…

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Teach us how to look after our mental health, say university students | Education

Students want universities to teach them how to look after their mental health and wellbeing as anxiety and stress levels surge on UK campuses, according to a survey. Ninety-six per cent of the 1,500 students polled by emotional fitness app Fika think universities should offer “emotional education” on the curriculum to improve their resilience against mental health problems. This would replicate the Department for Education’s plans to roll out wellbeing modules in schools from September 2020. The modules could help…

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