Robots Will Never Replace Teachers. They Can Only Displace Us – Education Article

 My favorite movie of all time is “2001: A Space Odyssey.”     And my favorite character is the computer HAL 9000.   In the future (now past) of the movie, HAL is paradoxically the most human personality. Tasked with running the day-to-day operations of a spaceship, HAL becomes strained to the breaking point when he’s given a command to lie about the mission’s true objectives. He ends up having a psychotic break and killing most of the people he…

Read More

Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Today I taught a lesson in which I shared a 4.5 minute excerpt of an amazing 55 minute NASA podcast, featuring an April 2019 interview with Dr. Harrison Schmitt, the Apollo 17 lunar module pilot and the only geologist to walk on the Moon to date! In this post, I’ll share my workflow and steps I followed to create this audio media collage, shared as a video on YouTube. Before sharing my workflow, I’ll address copyright / intellectual property issues.…

Read More

Economists Ate My School – Why Defining Teaching as a Transaction is Destroying Our Society – Education Article

    Teaching is one of the most misunderstood interactions in the world.     Some people see it as a mere transaction, a job: you do this, I’ll pay you that.     The input is your salary. The output is learning.    These are distinctly measurable phenomena. One is calculated in dollars and cents. The other in academic outcomes, usually standardized test scores. The higher the salary, the more valued the teacher. The higher the test scores, the…

Read More

‘The Netflixisation of academia’: is this the end for university lectures? | Education

Before this month’s strikes over low pay and pensions cuts, staff were warned to pause their lecture recordings while they told students that they would be taking part. The University and College Union (UCU), which organised the strike, worried that university management would search recordings to identify who would be engaging in industrial action, and introduce measures to lessen its impact. The union had good reason to be concerned: during last year’s strikes, the head of Edinburgh University’s law school…

Read More

We’ll keep fighting for the well-placed apostrophe | Letter | Education

The passing of the Apostrophe Preservation Society (Report, 2 December) is deeply regretted by the Queen’s English Society. We will carry on the fight for clear, accurate English, including correct punctuation, grammar, spelling and word-choice. The apostrophe helps us to distinguish between the general (The ships’ faults were lethal) and the specific (The ship’s faults were lethal), between the plural (boys) and the possessive (boy’s, boys’), and can even change a noun into a verb, with a change in meaning.…

Read More

The rise of EduTube: how social media influencers are shaping universities | Education

When Jack Edwards uploads a video to YouTube about the highs and lows of his life as a Durham University student, it is watched by 162,000 subscribers. This year the college at which he studies, St Augustine’s, has been oversubscribed for the first time. He’s been told that the college principal thinks this is no coincidence: he’s calling it “the Jack Edwards effect”. Despite his popularity, Edwards says people are often surprised to find he has no relationship with the…

Read More

The Stink of Segregation Needs to End in Steel Valley Schools – Education Article

 I am a teacher at Steel Valley Schools.   I am also an education blogger.   In order to belong to both worlds, I’ve had to abide by one ironclad rule that I’m about to break:   Never write about my home district.   Oh, I write about issues affecting my district. I write about charter schools, standardized testing, child poverty, etc. But I rarely mention how these things directly impact my school, my classroom, or my students.   I…

Read More

Big flute discovery and billionaire woes | Brief letters | Education

I was fascinated to read your obituary of Frank Giles (7 November) which contains the following: “His father died when he was 10, leaving the family in straitened circumstances … even so, enough money was found to send Giles to Wellington college.” As the current fees for Wellington seem to be approximately £30,000 per year, and presumably were the equivalent in the 1930s, could we please have the Guardian definition of “straitened circumstances”?Mike HoskinHinton St George, Somerset • My son’s…

Read More

NAEP Test Scores Show How Stupid We Are… To Pay Attention to NAEP Test Scores – Education Article

 Brace yourselves!   America’s NAEP test scores in 2019 stayed pretty much the same as they were in 2018!   And the media typically set its collective hair on fire trying to interpret the data.   Sometimes called the Nations Report Card, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) test is given to a random sampling of elementary, middle and high school students in member countries to compare the education systems of nations.   And this year there was one…

Read More

Teachers on Twitter: why you should join and how to get started | Teacher Network

I’ve been using Twitter for six months and it’s already one of the best career decisions I’ve made. For a while, it seemed that my relationship with teaching was going to be short lived (the first rush of excitement and energy was gone and in need of resuscitation). But thanks to some of the inspiring educators on Twitter, I have fallen back in love with teaching. Earlier this year, a colleague (@historychappy) presented a 10-minute continuing professional development session on…

Read More

What’s Up with TikTok? – Education Article

What do you get when you mash together Instagram, Vine, Flipagram, and Musical.ly? TikTok. My middle school students introduced me to TikTok this past school year when I noticed that my 6th grade girls were glued to it during recess.  Fifteen second videos that you can add music plus filters, stickers, text, and more. Here’s what the Heavy says about TikTok – it’s a: “global music and video platform, it was created in 2016 by Chinese internet technology company ByteDance.…

Read More

Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Yesterday in Oklahoma City, Storychasers hosted a 1 day conference on podcasting attended by educators and other people interested in podcasting from Oklahoma City as well as north Texas. I shared the opening keynote titled, “Who Tells Your Story,” along with two breakout session workshops on “Quick Edit Podcasting” using the Anchor mobile app, and Podcast Post-Production Tools and Tips. All the slides and resources for the conference are available on sites.google.com/view/podcastingokc/. In this post, I’ll reflect on some of…

Read More

Busing and School Segregation Used for Politics not Policy – Education Article

 If children of all races went to the same schools with each other, it would be harder to treat them unequally.   Moreover, it would be harder for them to grow up prejudiced because they would have learned what it’s like to have classmates who are different from them.   And though most people agree with these premises in principle, our laws still refuse to make them a reality in fact.   Perhaps that’s why it was so astounding when…

Read More

Norman Stone was brilliant, funny, a doll | Brief letters | Education

Re Richard Evans’ obituary of Norman Stone (26 June): what Evans says has truth in it, but it’s far from the whole truth. Stone was a brilliant teacher, hilarious company, a fascinating lecturer, and a charming admirer. And, which is surely the point about #MeToo, he didn’t get shirty or use it against you if you said no – which is why some of us didn’t. His becoming so rightwing and drunk in later life was a pity, but earlier…

Read More

Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Welcome to Episode 462 of Moving at the Speed of Creativity podcasts, a now-wildly irregular podcast by Dr. Wesley Fryer (@wfryer) focusing on digital creativity, media literacy, digital literacy and instructional technology. This episode includes two segments. The first is an interview with Megan Thompson (@seeingnewshapes), our elementary art teacher at Casady School in Oklahoma City. This past spring, Megan had an opportunity to travel to the Chicago area and spend part of a day with Tricia Fuglestad (@fuglefun). Tricia…

Read More

Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

We live in dynamic times, and it can be extremely valuable as well as thought provoking to have an opportunity to listen to an insightful scholar share analysis about our evolving information landscape. This evening, thanks to a tweet from Jackie Gerstein, I watched an hour long lecture presented by danah boyd (@zephoria) recently in Detroit focusing on “The Future of Information.” To understand our present and future, danah related (among other things) stories of how troll culture has emerged…

Read More