Constructivism is not a pedagogy – David Didau – Education Article

An article by Sarah Bergsen, Erik Meester, Paul Kirschner and Anna Bosman So-called ‘educational innovations’ in which the teacher assumes the role of ‘facilitator, mentor or coach’ do not appear to be very successful. Nevertheless, ‘constructivist’ ideas are still popular in education, as evidenced by the everlasting large number of minimally guided instructional practices. Sarah Bergsen, Erik Meester, Paul A. Kirschner and Anna Bosman say: “We could and should know better by now.” Constructivism is not a pedagogy Philosophers have…

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Madeline Held obituary | Education

My friend Madeline Held, who has died aged 76, spent much of her working life championing educational opportunities for adults who have been disadvantaged by their lack of literacy, English language or numeracy skills. For 20 years she was director of the Language and Literacy Unit in London, which she helped to develop from a small teacher support unit within the Inner London Education Authority (Ilea) to a national organisation supporting teachers of adults. The unit (later re-named LLU+ because…

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Margaret Meek Spencer obituary | Literacy

Margaret Meek Spencer, who has died aged 95, had a significant impact on the teaching of reading, and her books on the subject are still among the most influential in the field. She presented learning to read as a complex enterprise with meaning as both the guide and the reward. Against the dominant view that successful reading teaching was a matter of marching children through schemes and training them to answer dull comprehension questions, Margaret maintained that the basics of…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed school leaders, teachers, students and parents in the United States to respond in different ways to “shelter in place / shelter at home” mandates. It has pushed many K-12 teachers into the role of “emergency remote learning” instructors, even if the courses they teach were never intended to be “online” or “distance learning” courses, and irrespective of whether or not those instructors had past experiences as either students or teachers in distance learning courses. Some…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

The move to “remote learning” at our school in late-March 2020 has corresponded with an uptick in the number of online workshops and webinars I’ve offered for teachers, mainly for faculty at our school as part of my “day job,” but also a few evening and weekend virtual presentations. All of the workshops I’ve led or facilitated for our teachers are linked from the “Genius Bar” page of our school’s instructional support website, in reverse chronological order. I’ve also added…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

The neo-Coronavius / COVID-19 crisis is upon us in the United States. As we grapple as teachers with how to maintain wellness and self-care for ourselves, our families, and our students, it’s important to consider how we can each become more connected to our educator colleagues around the world for support and idea sharing. In this post, I’ll highlight three powerful ways we can each become more digitally connected during this crisis, while still maintaining healthy boundaries and screentime limits.…

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Resourceaholic: 5 Maths Gems #123 – Education Article

Welcome to my 123rd gems post. This is where I share some of the latest news, ideas and resources for maths teachers. *******************************A note to parents I’d like to say a big hello to parents who are visiting my blog looking for maths resources to use at home. Although there are plenty of resources here, really they are designed for teachers to use in lessons at school and many won’t really be suitable for distance learning.  Thankfully maths is very…

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Auditing Your Read Aloud – A Whole School Conversation – Pernille Ripp – Education Article

In 2010, I created a project called The Global Read Aloud, for the past 11 years I have been the driving force behind this global literacy initiative. For 11 years, I have asked educators to recommend books for us to read aloud on a global scale. To suggest books they feel would make for an incredible connection around the world. That will inspire students to learn more about others. That will inspire students to learn more about themselves. That will…

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Britain’s battle to get to grips with literacy is laid bare in H is for Harry | Education

Life repeats itself, Grant says dejectedly. “It’s just repeat, repeat, repeat. I had it, my dad had it, and now my son’s going to have it.” He’s talking about illiteracy, which has trapped his family in poverty and shame for generations. But Grant is desperate to break the cycle. His hopes are pinned on his son, Harry, the engaging star of a new documentary that tracks the boy’s struggles with reading and writing during his first two years at secondary…

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Children are reading less than ever before, research reveals | Education

Children today read less frequently than any previous generation and enjoy reading less than young people did in the past, according to new research. The work, to be published by the National Literacy Trust in the run-up to World Book Day on Thursday, shows that in 2019 just 26% of under-18s spent some time each day reading. This is the lowest daily level recorded since the charity first surveyed children’s reading habits in 2005. It also found that fewer children…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Yesterday morning I listened to a fantastic World Affairs (@world_affairs) podcast interview with UC Irvine professor, historian, and author Jeff Wasserstrom (@jwassers) by MaryKay Magistad (@MaryKayMagistad). Dr. Wasserstrom is the author of “Vigil: Hong Kong on the Brink” from February 2020, which was also the title of the interview from February 5, 2020. Dr. Wasserstrom also published “China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs To Know” in 2013. When I shared a link via Twitter to this recent World…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Last Thursday was the last day of our second trimester at school, and therefore the end of my second opportunity in 2019-20 to teach Digital and Media Literacy to 5th and 6th Graders. As classroom teachers, one of the things we quickly learn is how different the dynamics of separate classes can be based on the composition of students, their personalities, and the ways in which students interact and sometimes “play off of” each other. In this post, I’d like…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

For the past three years, I’ve had the opportunity to partner with our high school English department chair, Whitney Finley, who teaches a unique and engaging creative writing class for 12th graders in which they write and publish their own children’s picture books. After creating their books, as a group students visit our Kindergarten students and share their books with them in person. Later in the year, Kindergarten students create their own books, and then have an opportunity to share…

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A Few Favorite Books from Our Classroom for Teens Who Say They Can’t Find a Great Book – Pernille Ripp – Education Article

One of the many benefits there is from being an educator who reads a lot is that I get to create many different reading lists in my head. From the child that asks me to find another book just like the one they just read, to the colleague who needs some books to take their mind off of bigger things, to the child who tells me that they have never liked a single book, there are lists in my head…

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The Importance of Addressing “I’m so bored” Comments – Education Article

This past semester I was in the midst of teaching one of my favorite units that I’ve ever taught in my career thus far. My students read a play about characters who are a part of a First Nations community in British Columbia, Canada. The play, titled Where the Blood Mixes, deals with tragedy and trauma, sheds light on the effects of residential schools (where indigenous children were sent to be forcibly assimilated into the white colonial culture) on the…

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