Linguistics

Slip-up leaves priests rolling in the aisles | Brief letters | Education

We applaud the rise in state-sector intake across Oxford University and are glad to see individual colleges praised (Report, 16 January). Perhaps Mansfield College deserves a mention. In a quietly radical fashion, we have led the way in Oxford access for 20 years. Our state intake has been over 80% for 10 years and over 90% since 2016. And more than 90% of our state-sector intake this year is from non-selective schools – a meaningful statistic for Oxford University.Lucinda RumseySenior…

Read More

Knocked up due to lack of a rubber | Brief letters | Education

Re your article on the dating of the Church of the Nativity (Church of the Nativity Jeopardy answer sparks Israel-Palestine storm, 13 January), the full and correct answer to the Jeopardy question is “the Roman province of Syria-Palestina”. As currently conceived, neither “Palestine” nor “Israel” existed at that time, and even Syria-Palestina ceased to exist by AD 390.Dr James AndersonHastings, New Zealand • I read that Oakham has a betting shop but there is opposition to McDonald’s there (Report, 15…

Read More

Keeping your pecker up the English way | Brief letters | Education

The Travel section on rail journeys in Europe (11 January) was interesting and informative. However, next time perhaps you could add a supplement on how to get to London by train for those of us who do not live near there, as this is often the most unreliable, time-consuming or expensive part of the journey. It is easier, and often cheaper, to fly from Liverpool to Madrid and start our train journey there; and, yes, we are aware of the…

Read More

A language family tree – in pictures

Minna Sundberg’s illustration maps the relationships between Indo-European and Uralic languages. The creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, put the illustration together to show why some of the characters in her comic were able to understand each other despite speaking different languages. She wanted to show how closely related Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic were to each other, and how Finnish came from distinct linguistic roots Continue reading… Source link

Read More

The ultimate guide to Cockney rhyming slang | Education

Many of us know that “brown bread” is Cockney rhyming slang for dead, “china plate” for mate, and “bubble bath” for laugh. But how many know the meaning of the phrases? The historic native wit of this east end community (and its followers from around the world) often has an interesting logic to its phrases. Rather than simply a rhyming association, the slang reflects meaning in the expressions themselves. Here’s a guide to the most commonly-used Cockney rhyming slang: “Apples…

Read More