History books

Howard Clarke obituary | Education

My husband, Howard Clarke, who has died aged 76, was a sixth-form college principal in the north-east of England and a stout defender of the need for greater financial support for further education, in particular through his involvement with the Sixth Form Colleges Association. Howard was born in Sheffield, the son of Mary (nee Pemberton), a sales clerk, and James Clarke, a trade association secretary. He attended High Storrs grammar school in the city and then went to the London…

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Richard Sharpe obituary | Education

If any scholar could bring back to life the holy men and scholars of the Middle Ages it was Richard Sharpe. Richard, professor of diplomatic at Oxford University since 1998, who has died aged 66 of heart failure, was a man of abundant energy, which he poured into writing and editing a torrent of books and articles that threw light on all aspects of these men – saints and sinners alike. He was equally energetic outside his study – his…

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Roger Fieldhouse obituary | Education

My friend and former colleague Roger Fieldhouse, who has died aged 79 after a short illness, contributed significantly to two academic fields: local history; and the history and philosophy of modern British adult education. Roger was appointed tutor/organiser for the WEA (Workers’ Educational Association) in North Yorkshire in the mid-1960s, and developed a lifelong love of the area. He worked with local people to explore the history of their own communities. His book A History of Swaledale and Richmond (1978)…

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Polly Corrigan obituary | Education

My daughter, Polly Corrigan, who has died of cancer aged 45, was a PhD candidate and teaching assistant at King’s College London, leading seminars in intelligence and war studies. Polly was born in London, the elder of two children, and grew up around Camden Town, attending Haverstock school. Her father, Michael Corrigan, and I both worked as journalists. In 1992, Polly spent a year teaching English in nascent capitalist Moscow, nurturing a lifelong fascination with the outgoing Soviet system. At…

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Modelling the past to predict the future | Letters | Education

Laura Spinney’s important, excellent long read (Calculating the future, 12 November) draws attention to the developments in quantitative approaches to history pioneered by Jack Goldstone and Peter Turchin, including the journal Cliodynamics, and their predictive possibilities. She could have mentioned the predictive success of Turchin’s quantitative approach (including modelling the rise of popular unrest when average wages lag behind GDP growth per head, meaning rising inequality) regarding the rise of Donald Trump and of support for Brexit. My article in…

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