The Importance of Addressing “I’m so bored” Comments – Education Article

This past semester I was in the midst of teaching one of my favorite units that I’ve ever taught in my career thus far. My students read a play about characters who are a part of a First Nations community in British Columbia, Canada. The play, titled Where the Blood Mixes, deals with tragedy and trauma, sheds light on the effects of residential schools (where indigenous children were sent to be forcibly assimilated into the white colonial culture) on the…

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Teaching High School In December: A Three-Point Survival Guide – Education Article

For high school students, the month of December has lost its luster. There is no belief in Santa, and the elf is missing from its shelf. Replacing the holiday excitement is a mature appreciation of scarcity and disparity.   Adolescents are a blend of intellect and naivety. Their eyes are opening to a world that they previously defined differently. They are struggling to find their place in this world, and they are under incredible stress to perform academically and socially.  December…

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Hour of Code: How Students Can Build Their Own Apps – Education Article

In my high school teacher forums, as part of the discussion on preparing kids for college and career, we talk a lot about the huge shortfall in applicants for a growing list of tech jobs. Despite robust pay, excellent work conditions, and the value they place on creativity, jobs sit open. How do we get kids excited about careers that traditionally sound boring and math-oriented? Websites like Code.org have a great approach to making coding accessible to all kids but…

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“Why haven’t I learned that Harriet Tubman fought in the civil war?” – Education Article

On a cold day in central New York, I had the fantastic opportunity to take 26 students to tour the Harriet Tubman National Park, located in Auburn, NY. After an enlightening hour, we loaded onto the yellow submarine (aka the school bus) and watched the movie Harriet at the local Movie Tavern.   By the end of the day, with our minds bursting with new paradigms, our focus for our upcoming black history celebration in February cemented. More importantly, as members of a…

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Dear Teachers, Parents, and Teachers Who Are Parents: You Do Not Need To Trust Your Teen, They Need To Trust You – Education Article

Teenagers are weird and stupid. They make rash, half-cocked decisions creating consequences that bring parents to their knees. Since our oldest became a teenager two school years ago, I have prayed so frequently that my deceased, Catholic grandparents would be proud. I am not a good Christian or particularly spiritual, but being a mom of a teenager has made me religious. I have prayed while driving, cooking, and showering. Downtime brings thoughts, and thoughts lead to anxiety.   Parenting is constant,…

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A mandaory FAFSA for high school diplomas coul college graduation rate – Education Article

The Hechinger Report is a national nonprofit newsroom that reports on one topic: education. Sign up for our weekly newsletters to get stories like this delivered directly to your inbox. Here’s an idea worth pursuing: Make every U.S. high school student complete a FAFSA before graduating, to move more students toward college. Here are two more: Hire more school counselors, and simplify the forms for federal aid. As part of a larger movement to bring college-admissions requirements to students, rather…

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In Defense of Fairy Tales in High School – Education Article

Last year, I taught The Princess Bride in my classroom, which is a fairy tale satire. To make sure my students understood what, exactly, William Golding was making fun of, we spent about six days taking a deep look at fairy tales. I was amazed at the conversations we had. Students were struck by how the place a fairy was set changed the tale. They marveled at how fairy tales were used to share some sort of wisdom for children. Most of…

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7 programs that are transforming education – Education Article

Innovative tools and strategies are transforming education, and the best educators recognize this growing trend and harness it to benefit their students. Fuel Education’s Transformation Awards recognize schools, districts or organizations that are successfully transforming education, the way teachers teach, and how students learn. The awards highlight seven exemplary programs from Fuel Education’s partner school districts. Each Transformation Award winner uses online courses and adaptive learning tools to meet the varying needs of their students, who represent different demographic, economic…

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Your 2019 School Year in Review [Infographic] – Education Article

It’s the end of the school year, teachers! Whether you’re zooming across the finish line — or making slow, steady progress toward it — you should be proud of all that you’ve accomplished this year. As you begin to pack up your classroom, let’s take a look back at the school year and what that journey may have looked like for you. Because, sometimes, you just need a good laugh to get you through these last few days and weeks.…

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“Are You Chinese?” | The TpT Blog – Education Article

This post originally appeared on the blog Math with Ms. Yi. My first teaching job straight out of undergrad was teaching 6th grade math in New York at a school located in Washington Heights. A majority of my students identified as Dominican and a few identified as black; we had no students who identified as white or Asian. At my school, I was the only Asian American middle school teacher. On the second day of school, one of my students…

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One-Pagers: The Simplest Way to Success – Education Article

This post originally appeared on the blog Spark Creativity. One-pagers are becoming increasingly popular as a way to help students process what they’ve read, in one powerful activity. Like sketchnotes, they combine visuals with text to make ideas come alive in students’ minds and memories. But it’s easy for students to struggle with one-pagers if they’re not naturally inclined toward art and have not previously been encouraged to represent their ideas this way. They may feel they are being graded…

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Movies Based on Books, a Help or a Hindrance? – Education Article

Over spring break, I read an amazing book called Readicide by Kelly Gallagher. We’ve talked about the book on the site before in this excellent article, so I won’t go too in depth here. We do not have reading goals in my classroom, mostly for the reasons that Gallagher outlines. I want my students to read because they like to read, because they’re excited about the book they’ve chosen and not because they feel like they have to. I liked the…

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How to Make the Most of Maps in Social Studies – Education Article

This post originally appeared on the blog Education with DocRunning. Okay, so let me be completely transparent here: I love maps. I have a huge National Geographic Atlas at home, and I love looking at not only the political maps but also the other maps such as population density. I just like examining it and thinking about the world from different lenses. Even as a student, I always loved making maps as part of each unit of study. And as…

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High School Electives for Homeschoolers: A Huge Resource List – Education Article

High School is a time for youth to explore a variety of topics and experiences as they attempt to discover what things interest them for their future. It’s an opportunity to study topics beyond the basic core that might not have been covered yet or to get more in-depth with a specific subject. Here are some resources to help you plan out your high school electives. High School Student by BillionPhotos.com on BigStockPhoto.com In general, high school core subjects are…

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Dissing the Family Crazies: A Christmas Story – Education Article

Ahhhh… the two weeks teachers wait for that never seem to get here fast enough. I was so ready to be done with 2018 I had a collection of white flags hidden in my desk that I found myself waving ever so slightly throughout that last week of school. So as I got off of winter break, I hastily tried to get caught up on everything that I’ve been behind on since July. Especially this year because I thought Christmas was…

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