Ofsted chief: pupils’ wellbeing at risk as sport is squeezed out of schools | Education

The Ofsted chief inspector has called on the government to do more to increase sport in schools amid growing concern that physical education is being squeezed out of the curriculum as a result of funding cuts and excessive focus on exam results. Amanda Spielman told the Observer it was essential that ministers and school leaders acted to show they understood what should be obvious – that sport and exercise for young people were vital parts of a full and balanced…

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700 English schools reported over asbestos safety concerns | Education

Nearly 700 schools have been referred to the national health and safety body over concerns they are failing to safely manage asbestos in their buildings, potentially putting thousands of staff and pupils at risk, it has been revealed. It is thought that about 90% of school buildings in England contain asbestos, often around pipes and boilers, and in wall and ceiling tiles. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) advises that it is only a risk if it is disturbed or…

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#FaceTheFacts: It’s time to bust the myths on comprehensive sexuality education – Education Article

Image: Luciana Ianiri Comprehensive sexuality education is an essential part of a good quality education that improves sexual and reproductive health, argues Facing the Facts, our newest policy paper out today jointly with UNESCO. Released at the Women Deliver Conference during an event with Rt Hon. Helen Clark, the First Lady of Namibia and Vivian Onano, the paper explores the resistance to sexuality education in many countries and the obstacles to its implementation, seeking ways to overcome them. Globally, each…

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Time to stop neglecting education for adults | Letters | Education

Gaby Hinsliff is right (My dad studied late in life. He wouldn’t get the chance now, 1 June). She knows from family experience that mature learning is rich in rewards both professional and personal. The Augar report acknowledges this, making positive recommendations as to how to extend its reach: the reintroduction of maintenance grants is particularly helpful. Welcome as it is, this development merely foreshadows what should be a policy direction for the future. As president of Birkbeck I know…

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Higher education staff suffer ‘epidemic’ of poor mental health | Education

The number of university workers accessing counselling and occupational health services has shot up, according to research which describes “an epidemic” of poor mental health among higher education staff. Freedom of information requests revealed that at one university, staff referrals to counselling services went up more than 300% over a six-year period up to 2015 while, at another, referrals to occupational health soared by more than 400%. There has been growing awareness of the crisis in student mental health in…

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What Every Teacher Needs to Know About Concussions – Education Article

Whether you work with preschoolers, elementary-age or older kids, head injuries are going to happen. And the reality is teachers are often on the front line when it comes to concussions. Here’s what you need to know. What is a concussion? A concussion is “a type of brain injury that changes the way the brain normally works.” A bump, blow, or jolt to the head can cause a concussion. “Concussions can also occur from a fall or blow to the…

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‘It’s cut-throat’: half of UK academics stressed and 40% thinking of leaving | Education

When Ed Harris, a management lecturer at a modern university, stopped sleeping and began having marriage problems, he realised he was no longer coping with the pressures of his job. “Most of the time you handle it, but the anger and unhappiness build up,” says Harris (not his real name). “I was constantly stressed. There was a lot of micromanagement and setting of deadlines and I was always working late and checking emails at all hours.” Harris says he went…

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‘She went through torment’: parents criticise Bristol over student suicide | Education

“They had six months to help but didn’t do anything.” That is the verdict of Natasha Abrahart’s parents. Margaret and Robert Abrahart have accused Bristol University and mental health services of letting down their student daughter who had severe social anxiety and was found hanged on the day she was due to give a daunting presentation. They argue the university should have known her condition made it excruciatingly difficult to talk in front of other students or teachers; that it…

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Mapping Infectious Disease Trends – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

Matt Kuehl’s high school biology students investigated the frequency of common biological pathogens. Then they investigated the death rates of several diseases and plotted them on a mega map. Students identified correlations between the frequencies of the diseases and the locations of high death rates. Matt Kuehl is a 10th-grade science teacher at Grand Rapids High School in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. Photo by Shelly Lindstrom What inspired you to take the topic of infectious diseases, which you teach every year,…

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Schools should have one meat-free day a week, says charity | Education

All state schools in England should offer pupils a compulsory plant-based menu one day a week, under new recommendations to the government that aim to make school meals more environmentally friendly and reflect changing dietary advice. Given wide acceptance that diets need to change to address the climate crisis – including by eating less meat and more beans and pulses – the Soil Association is urging the Department for Education to replace a non-mandatory recommendation for a weekly meat-free day…

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The good life | E-Learning Provocateur – Education Article

In a previous role I had cause to draw up an employee lifecycle. Despite my years in HR up until that point, it wasn’t something that had ever occurred to me to do. The driving force was an idea to support managers through the various people-related matters to which they needed to attend. The employee lifecycle would provide the structure for a platform containing information and resources that our managers could draw upon on demand. After a bit of googlising,…

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Louder than words | E-Learning Provocateur – Education Article

My last couple of blog posts have argued in favour of extracting value out of organisational capabilities. Due to the nature of my role I have posited these arguments in terms of employee development. However, I further advocate the use of organisational capabilities across all parts of the employee lifecycle. Using the 4+4 Part Employee Lifecycle as my guide, I will share my thoughts on some of the ways in which your capability framework can add value to your organisation’s…

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The Guardian view on shrinking breaks: the right to relax | Editorial | Opinion

Few adults would place shorter break times high up their list of concerns about schools. Some of them may have shone at football but many will remember hours spent pointlessly milling around the playground or, worse, smoking in the toilets? For a minority of children, now as then, breaks are dreadful. If you don’t have many friends, or aren’t part of the group you would like to join, the experience of leaving the classroom to spend time with your peers…

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Stephen Fry backs calls to review relationships and sex education | Education

Stephen Fry has backed calls urging the government to review its new compulsory programme of relationships and sex education (RSE), due to be rolled out to schools next year, suggesting that it does not go far enough. The actor is one of a number of signatories to a letter addressed to the education secretary, Damian Hinds, which says that “political, religious and cultural sensitivities should not be allowed to thwart mandatory age-appropriate RSE in every school” from the first year…

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Suicidal Bristol student left without medicine, inquest hears | Education

A vulnerable university student who twice tried to kill herself was left for a month without anti-depressant medication before she was found dead, an inquest has heard. Natasha Abrahart was concerned she could lose her place on a prestigious science course and university GPs had concluded she was a high suicide risk, the court was told. The 20-year-old was referred to local mental health services and initially prescribed anti-depressants. But the inquest heard she had been left with no medication…

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