Comparative Assessment In The Classroom – Education Article

Reading Time: 2 minutes What is comparative assessment and how can teachers use it in their classroom? Psychologist, Louis Thurstone, published a paper on the law of comparative judgment in 1927! Thurstone’s method of comparative judgement exploits the power of adaptivity; in scoring rather than testing. There has been a recent and welcome revival of comparative assessment, but it has been around for a long time and one could argue that we are 90 years too late. With an influx…

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What do students think about marking? – David Didau – Education Article

Over the past year or so, I’ve been doing some very informal research into students’ attitudes and opinions with some of the schools I work with on an ongoing basis. Two years ago I wrote 2 posts summarising the problems with marking and suggesting an alternative way forward: Since then I’ve been recommending that one of the ways schools can seek to reduce teachers’ work load is to move away from the expectation that teachers must write extended comments in…

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Just Ask Them – The Teacher And The Admin – Education Article

One of the best trends in education is the continued innovation and increased value of professional development. The days of putting in your time while some random person goes over rules and regulations or leads a glorified pep rally of everything the district does well are, thankfully, over. Districts are spending more time and resources that emphasize improved practices, improved implementation of the curriculum, and improved awareness of student health. The quality of those Superintendent Conference Days and Professional Development…

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Footnote, Endnote, Thank-you Notes – Faculty Focus – Education Article

Thank-you notes make people happy. For as much joy as they give me, I don’t send them enough. In fact, I think writing thank-you notes is a dying art. They’re overlooked forms of positive closure. Gratitude on its own is powerful, and when it’s exchanged, it feels amazing. After I thought about what notes of gratitude could accomplish, I started emailing thank-you notes to my students, waiting until well after the semester for the most impact.  As someone who teaches…

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Feedback Should Be a Dialogue, Not a Monologue – Education Article

A Principal’s Reflections: Feedback Should Be a Dialogue, Not a Monologue Feedback Should Be a Dialogue, Not a Monologue Feedback can bring people together in the pursuit of a shared goal. Criticism, on the other hand, can drive people apart. In many situations going with the former is the better course of action.  Below is a piece I pulled from an article titled Using Neuroscience to Make Feedback Work and Feel Better that explains why it matters so much: Feedback…

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On Coaching: You Give Two Kinds of Feedback. Are They Aligned?? – Education Article

01.11.19On Coaching: You Give Two Kinds of Feedback. Are They Aligned?? Here’s a slide I showed recently to coaches at a workshop: The slide is an attempt to describe a common challenge I see in the teaching/coaching of athletes. Here’s the scene. Athletes are playing. We are observing them as coaches. We notice something that needs to be improved. So we stop and make a teaching point.  All of this is to the good-especially if we can discipline ourselves to…

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A Principal’s Reflections: Top Posts of 2018 – Education Article

A Principal’s Reflections: Top Posts of 2018 Top Posts of 2018 Get up and write!  Well, this isn’t the saying that I abide by, but making the time to reflect and hammer away at the keyboard is something that I still consistently commit to doing.  There are many reasons I continue to blog regularly, but the biggest is trying to add a practical lens to many of the ideas we either see or hear about on social media. During the…

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