Federal Student Aid

How to Fill Out the FAFSA® Form When You Have More Than One Child in College – Education Article

Having one child who is heading to college can be stressful but having to help multiple children at the same time can feel overwhelming. Here are the answers to some frequently asked questions about filling out the FAFSA form when you have more than one child in college: How many FSA IDs will my children and I need? An FSA ID is a username and password combination that serves as your legal electronic signature throughout the financial aid process. You…

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The Parent’s Guide to Filling Out the FAFSA® Form – Education Article

While the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form is the student’s application, we know that parents often play a large role in the process. After all, students who are considered dependent have to provide parental information on the FAFSA form anyway and must have a parent sign it. While we recommend that the student start his or her own FAFSA form, we know that’s not always what happens. With that in mind, we wanted to provide instructions for parents who are starting…

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Scholarship Basics and Tips – ED.gov Blog – Education Article

We all know college is super expensive; not only do you have to pay tuition, but there’s also room and board (for those of you staying on campus), a meal plan (yay for cafeteria food…), and textbooks (buying hundred-dollar books for one chapter). It’s a lot. Luckily for us, there’s help: scholarships! Of course there’s no guarantee that you’ll actually be awarded any money, and sometimes it can seem like a whole lot of work for a whole lot of…

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5 Things to Do Before Making Your First Student Loan Payment – Education Article

Almost time to start paying back your student loans?  Contrary to popular belief, your student loan payments don’t have to stop you from living your life. You just have to weigh your options and find a strategy that works within your budget. Here are some steps to get you started. 1. Compare monthly payment amounts If you don’t think you can afford that amount or you want a lower monthly payment, consider switching to an income-driven repayment plan, where your…

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Stay On Track This Summer: 4 Tips for Incoming College Freshmen – Education Article

A recent post, covers the concern of “summer melt,” where up to one-third of the students who graduate high school with plans to go to college never make it to a college campus. The post discussed how educators  can help keep someone on track—but there’s also plenty that a student can do to make sure their college plans don’t get derailed during a summer break. Open every piece of snail mail you get from the college, and read all of it!  …

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11 Common FAFSA® Mistakes – ED.gov Blog – Education Article

The 2020–21 FAFSA® will be available October 1! If you plan to attend college between July 1, 2020, and June 30, 2021, you should fill out your FAFSA form as soon as possible! Just make sure you don’t make one of these common mistakes: 1. Not Completing the FAFSA Form We hear all kinds of reasons: “The FAFSA form is too hard.” “It takes too long to complete.” “I’ll never qualify anyway, so why does it matter?” It does matter. For one,…

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3 Types of FAFSA® Deadlines You Should Pay Attention To – Education Article

  Ah, deadlines. The sworn enemy of students across the nation. When you’re busy with classes, extracurricular activities, and a social life in whatever time you’ve got left, it’s easy to lose track and let due dates start whooshing by. All of a sudden, your 10-page term paper is due in an hour, and you’re only on page 5 (with the help of 26-point type and triple line spacing). We get it. Nevertheless, we’re here to point out a few…

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7 Things You Need Before You Fill Out the 2020–21 FAFSA® Form – Education Article

If you need financial aid to help you pay for college, you must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form. The 2020–21 FAFSA form will be available on Oct. 1, 2019. You should fill it out as soon as possible on or after Oct. 1 at the official government site, fafsa.gov. It’ll be easier to complete the FAFSA form if you gather what you need ahead of time. Below is what you’ll need to fill it out.…

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Applying for Public Service Loan Forgiveness: 5 Tips for Success – Education Article

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) is a program that could eliminate some of your federal student loan debt if you meet all the requirements. This program was created to benefit individuals whose debt would be unaffordable without loan payments tied to income because they are working in lower-paying, but vitally important public sector jobs such government service or non-profit work. There are some steps you can take to protect yourself from any surprises and set realistic expectations about how PSLF…

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The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Help Tool – Education Article

Chances are that you’ve at least heard of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program, but do you know if your loans qualify? How to apply? If not, we’re here to help! First, what is PSLF? PSLF is a program that forgives the remaining balance on your Direct Loans after you have made 120 qualifying monthly payments under a qualifying repayment plan while working full-time for a qualifying employer. However, your loan will only be forgiven if you meet all the PSLF…

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PLUS Loan Basics for Parents – Education Article

Your child is going to college or career school—that’s great! But you may have questions about how to pay for it. If your child hasn’t completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®), ask your child to complete it today. Completing and submitting the FAFSA is free and quick, and it gives your child access to the largest source of financial aid to pay for college or career school, including loans YOU can receive. After applying for financial aid, your child…

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Student Loan Forgiveness (and Other Ways the Government Can Help You Repay Your Loans) – Education Article

Here’s a question a lot of people may be wondering… Is it really possible to have my federal student loans forgiven or to get help repaying them? The answer is: Yes! However, there are very specific eligibility requirements for each situation in which you can apply for loan forgiveness or receive help with repayment. Loan forgiveness means that you don’t have to pay back some or all of your loan. You never know what you may be eligible for, so take…

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5 Things to Know When Evaluating a Financial Aid Offer – Education Article

April is National Financial Capability Month and understanding the terms of your financial aid offer and making smart decisions about paying for college can be a good indicator of your financial capability. Many schools use the term “award letter” which can be misleading and make it sound like all the aid that is listed will all be awarded to you. This notification (paper or electronic) is an offer, which means that you are not obligated to take all the aid…

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Keeping the Cost of College Down – Education Article

Between the high costs of tuition, living expenses, meal plans and textbooks, it is easy to see why college students are increasingly stressed about their finances. A 2015 survey  found that around 70% of college students feel stressed about their personal finances in general. As a current student at UCLA, I too have felt the financial strain of an undergraduate education. Luckily, I have found that there are many simple actions college students can take to reduce the cost of postsecondary…

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Redesigning the Financial Aid Offer Letter at the University of Pennsylvania – Education Article

Every year, incoming and current college students have to file a FAFSA in order to determine their potential and continued eligibility for federal financial aid. Students may also have to file institution-based financial aid applications every year, along with institution-based or outside scholarships. Offer letters are key tools used by colleges and universities to notify students of their eligibility for federal, state, and institutional financial aid. Students and families use these letters to determine what the cost of attending that…

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The Value of Financial Literacy and Self Advocacy – Education Article

In my senior year of high school, as college decisions were released, opening the financial aid award letters was scarier than the decisions themselves: the final number, or net cost, could make or break my ability to attend university. To confuse matters, without an understanding of financial aid terms, award letters can be hard to read; each school’s letter can look different and are full of ambiguous terms and unexplained costs. No matter how well a particular award letter was…

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