Education

Welsh, Hawaiian and Navajo … now Gaelic is in line for a rescue | Education

Sorley MacLean’s poem Hallaig, a lament to the cleared homesteads of the Isle of Raasay, is his most famous work, lauded by Seamus Heaney, the Irish Nobel laureate whose translation was published in 2002, and the inspiration for countless other poets and songsmiths. Yet few have ever read the poem as MacLean wrote it, or any of the other masterworks from the lyrical canon of Scottish Gaelic literature. Barely 60,000 people speak Gaelic, one of Britain’s fragile minority languages which…

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Cambridge don leaves college after new investigation into harassment claims | Education

A Cambridge don has agreed to permanent exclusion from his college following allegations that he breached sanctions placed on him two years ago after an internal investigation into complaints that he had sexually harassed undergraduates. Peter Hutchinson, a non-stipendiary fellow at Trinity Hall, was banned in September 2015 from teaching undergraduates and attending social events where they were present. Trinity Hall, whose alumni include Stephen Hawking and the Oscar-winning actor Rachel Weisz, launched an investigation earlier this month into whether…

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Britain’s private school problem: it’s time to talk | Education

The existence in Britain of a flourishing private-school sector not only limits the life chances of those who attend state schools but also damages society at large, and it should be possible to have a sustained and fully inclusive national conversation about the subject. Whether one has been privately educated, or has sent or is sending one’s children to private schools, or even if one teaches at a private school, there should be no barriers to taking part in that…

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Charter Schools Cherry Pick Students & Call it Choice – PART 1: The “I Didn’t Do It!” Excuse – Education Article

  It takes a certain kind of hypocrite to be a charter school champion.   You have to deny any wrongdoing one minute. And then admit you’re guilty but explain it away with the excuse “Everyone’s doing it!” the next.  Take cherry picking – one of the most common admonishments leveled against the school privatization industry.  Detractors claim that charter schools keep enrollment low and then out of those who apply, they pick and choose which students to accept.  Charters…

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Teaching is ruining my life, but I don’t know what to do instead | Guardian Careers

We asked readers to get in touch with work-related problems they need guidance on. An anonymous teacher, 41, from West Yorkshire, wrote: I’m desperate to get out of teaching. It’s exhausting, stressful and is ruining my life. I’m not a senior leader so can’t go on to be a consultant or inspector. I’ve been teaching for over a decade and most of the jobs I’ve seen that suit my skills and experience could mean taking over a 50% pay cut.…

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‘Symbolically posh’ Bristol University expanding to wrong side of tracks | Education

In the well-heeled district of Clifton in Bristol, with its Georgian crescents and French brasseries, 100% of school leavers go to university. Yet in the southern suburb of Hartcliffe, the figures are the lowest in the country: only 8.6% make it there. This is the divided face of Brexit Britain. Bristol University, part of the Russell Group and a favourite among private school students, has long been at the privileged heart of Clifton. But it has radical plans to pull…

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How good are you at GCSE maths? Take our quiz | Education

If you haven’t done a maths exam for a while, or had anyone living with you who is studying for one, you might be curious about what goes into a GCSE maths paper these days. Here’s a chance to test yourself with these 20 questions taken from last year’s real papers. We can’t replicate exam conditions. In the real world, pupils taking GCSE maths have to sit four-and-a-half hours of exams. Ninety minutes of that is a paper for which…

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GCSE results day 2019: increase in top grades – live | Education

Amy Walker has been speaking to delighted pupils at a voluntary aided King David High School in Liverpool – a Jewish school that admits children from 11 to 18 of all faiths. Ben Franks, 16, is among those now in the queue to register for the school’s sixth form after receiving GCSE grades including an 8 (equivalent to an A*), two 7s (A) and three 6s (B). Revising “got really weird at one point,” he said. “I basically developed a…

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Pupils with behavioural issues failing to meet exam benchmark | Education

Only one out of every 25 pupils in schools for those with behavioural difficulties or exclusions managed to gain passes in English and maths GCSEs this year, according to national data which also shows little headway being made in improving overall exam results. Just 4% of those in England attending pupil referral units or similar alternative provision achieved grade 4s or higher in maths and English, while just 1.5% managed at least 5s in both subjects, the government’s favoured “strong…

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‘It’s dangerous’: full chaos of funding cuts in England’s schools revealed | Education

The impact of the funding crisis in England’s schools is laid bare in a Guardian investigation that reveals a system falling apart at the seams, with teachers covering for canteen staff and cleaners while essential funds are raised by parent donations and “charity” non-uniform days. Teachers and parents who responded to a Guardian callout complained there was not enough money even for basics such as textbooks, stationery and science equipment. They say children with special educational needs (SEN) are the…

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‘School is very oppressive’: why home-schooling is on the rise | Education

Every morning Ben Mumford starts his school day with maths. At the age of 10 he is already working at GCSE level, but he doesn’t always bother to get out of his pyjamas in time for the class. He reads more books than most of his friends, studies science on the beach, and recently built a go-kart in a technology lesson. Ben is happy and fulfilled. All, his mother Claire Mumford believes, thanks to home-schooling. “It’s not that I’m anti-establishment,”…

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UK universities’ BME staff less likely to hold top jobs | Education

Black and minority ethnic (BME) academic staff at UK universities are paid less than their white counterparts and are considerably less likely to hold the most senior jobs, analysis shows. Research by the University and College Union found that BME university staff faced a pay gap of 9% compared with their white colleagues, and black staff a 14% gap. Black academic staff are severely under-represented in the most senior academic roles, according to the UCU. One in nine white academic…

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‘What exactly do you hate about teaching?’ – our work expert responds | Guardian Careers

Teaching is ruining my life. I have other skills, so how do I find my niche? I’m desperate to get out of teaching. It’s exhausting, stressful and is ruining my life. I’m not a senior leader so can’t go on to be a consultant or inspector. I’ve been teaching for over a decade and most of the jobs I’ve seen that suit my skills and experience could mean taking more than a 50% pay cut. I feel trapped. I have…

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How I found my vocation: ‘I was told I wasn’t intelligent enough to study’ | Education

I always wanted to study law, but as a teenager I was told I wasn’t smart enough. That put me off for years. I grew up in west London in a working-class, single-parent family. My mother, who was a chauffeur, had my sister when I was 13; it was a difficult birth and she was in intensive care for a long time. She also suffered from postnatal depression, so I spent a lot of time caring for my baby sister…

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Revise, reuse, recycle: how to be a sustainable student | Education

As university doors opened in September for a new year, an estimated 6 million people across the world took to the streets in a historic week of climate action. The power of this youth-led uprising reflected the urgency for action on the environment. So what now? For freshers starting a new chapter at university, deciding how to live your life is vital. Here are some ideas for how you can be sustainable as a student. Eating What you put on…

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Oxford professor accused of selling ancient Bible fragments | Education

An Oxford University professor has been accused of selling ancient Bible fragments to a controversial US company that has been involved in several high-profile scandals related to its aggressive purchases of biblical artefacts. Dirk Obbink, one of the world’s most celebrated classics professors, has been named after an investigation by staff associated with Oxford’s Oxyrhynchus Papyri project. He is accused of selling without permission a number of ancient fragments to the US arts and crafts chain Hobby Lobby. Its owners,…

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