Department for Education

Dear Gavin Williamson, how that strange prisons have to have a library but schools do not | Michael Rosen | Education

Did you see the report on school libraries that came out last week? The headline facts are worrying, don’t you think? Schools with a higher proportion of children on free school meals are more than twice as likely not to have access to a designated library space. One in eight schools has no library at all. And employment terms for librarians and library staff fall below national standards, with low pay and little investment in professional development and training. The…

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Pupils with behavioural issues failing to meet exam benchmark | Education

Only one out of every 25 pupils in schools for those with behavioural difficulties or exclusions managed to gain passes in English and maths GCSEs this year, according to national data which also shows little headway being made in improving overall exam results. Just 4% of those in England attending pupil referral units or similar alternative provision achieved grade 4s or higher in maths and English, while just 1.5% managed at least 5s in both subjects, the government’s favoured “strong…

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Education secretary backs review of university admissions | Education

The education secretary, Gavin Williamson, has backed a review into university admissions, including a fresh look at whether school leavers should only apply for places after receiving their A-level results. Williamson said recent developments, such as the steep rise in unconditional offers to sixth-formers, reopened questions over the admissions system and its calendar, as part of a review being carried out by the Office for Students (OfS), the higher education regulator for England. “I recognise that we need to review…

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Science and language teachers to get £9,000 ‘staying on’ bonus | Education

New science and modern languages teachers in England will receive “staying on” bonuses of up to £9,000 from next year, as the government announced a fresh round of trainee bursaries and scholarships on the heels of pre-election pay rises and increased school funding. The Department for Education (DfE) said that from 2020, new teachers with degrees in physics or chemistry, or in languages such as French or Spanish, would join those with maths degrees in being eligible for “early-career payments”…

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Teaching workload: requires improvement | Letters | Education

Your editorial (19 September) begins to unpick some of the reasons why retention and, in some areas, recruitment are such a problem in this beleaguered and overwhelmed profession. Successive attempts to address this problem have failed to grasp the true causes which are, depressingly, characterised by the report of the leaked government document advocating swapping “workload-inducing practices for evidence-based approaches”. This, like all the other initiatives, is an attempt to shift the responsibility for this matter on to schools, thereby…

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Migration and empire ‘should be taught in English schools’ | Education

The government is being urged to make lessons on migration, belonging and empire mandatory in every secondary school in England. The Runnymede Trust, a race equality thinktank, said last year’s Windrush scandal had exposed a “shocking lack of understanding” at government level about the winding up of the empire. It wants to see a new approach to teaching on the subject in schools, which will ensure all pupils learn about migration and empire, and teachers are properly trained and equipped…

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Head of top Catholic school stands down after damning report | Education

England’s most prestigious Catholic school, Ampleforth college, is facing a new leadership crisis after an inspection found it was failing to meet child protection standards. The college confirmed its acting head, Deirdre Rowe, was stepping down after just 10 months in the job, and an interim head would be appointed. The move follows an unannounced inspection to monitor progress, carried out in May at the request of the Department for Education. According to a report in Catholic journal the Tablet,…

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(SPAG) Tests: Spelling, Punctuation And Grammar – Education Article

(SPAG) Tests: Spelling, Punctuation And Grammar | TeacherToolkit 14th May 201914th May 2019 @TeacherToolkit 52 Views Committee for Linguistics in Education, Department for Education, Grammar, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Lancaster University, Memory, National Curriculum, Punctuation, SATs, Testing, vocabulary, Willem B. Hollmann, Year 2 Reading Time: 3 minutes Are teachers supported by the Department for Education to deliver primary tests? In the run-up to SATs, I was contacted by Willem B. Hollmann, Lancaster University from his work with the…

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DfE in fresh effort to get academy chains to cut executive pay | Education

The Department for Education has embarked on a new effort to persuade school academy chains to tackle their executives’ high pay after trust managers proved largely resistant to previous attempts. The DfE said the head of its education and skills funding agency had written to 94 academy trusts asking them to justify high pay for executives and headteachers, including 63 academies paying several staff more than £100,000 a year. It said it would write again to 31 trusts that failed…

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Damian Hinds to lobby Treasury for multi-year education funds | Education – Education Article

The education secretary, Damian Hinds, is to lobby the Treasury for a multi-year funding settlement for education in England similar to the 10-year package announced for the NHS, MPs were told. Hinds, appearing before parliament’s education select committee, said he would make a “a very compelling case” for more funding in this year’s spending review, agreeing that something similar to the recent NHS long-term plan was needed. The cabinet minister’s pledge came as he was put under pressure by his…

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Scandalous increase in school exclusions | Letters | Education – Education Article

Last year I gave a paper based on my book Immoral Education: The Assault on Teachers’ Identities, Autonomy and Efficacy to academics in the Netherlands. When I told them that part of my argument was the rate at which young people were being excluded from schools and gave them the figures, the response was that “if that were happening here there would be national outrage”. The UK figures are now even worse (School exclusion rates in London double the national…

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