Culture

‘I was always told I was unusual’: why so few women design video games | Education

There’s a stereotype that women don’t play video games, but it couldn’t be further from the truth. The numbers don’t lie: 52% of gamers were female in the UK’s last major study in 2014. But if we look at the proportion of female workers in the games industry, it’s just 28% in the UK, and roughly 20% worldwide. If so many women are playing games, why are so few making them? The problem lies in the feedback loop of under-representation…

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Shirt worn by Charles I for his execution to go on display in London | Culture

On 30 January 1649, King Charles I of England took to the scaffold outside the Banqueting House in London’s Whitehall. He had requested two shirts to prevent himself from shivering from the cold, a reflex he thought could be mistaken for fear. He knelt in front of the crowd and placed his head on a block. Moments later, the axe fell. Now, 371 years later, the pale blue vest worn by Charles during his execution is to go on display.…

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Oxford don suspended over alleged artefact theft could still gain from sale | Education

An Oxford academic suspected of involvement in the alleged theft of ancient Gospel manuscripts stands to gain from a government appeal to purchase an important artefact for the nation. Dr Dirk Obbink, associate professor in papyrology and Greek at Christ Church, is the owner of the artefact – a unique book dating from around 1414. The arts minister, Helen Whateley, has announced a temporary export bar on the precious Myrowr of Recluses, or “Mirror of Recluses”, a Middle-English volume of…

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Cambridge University issues trigger warnings for Shakespeare lecture | Education

Cambridge students have been given timetables bearing “trigger warnings” to alert them that a lecture on the works of Shakespeare could be upsetting. In the English faculty’s notes on lectures document, students were warned that a lecture discussing the plays Titus Andronicus and The Comedy of Errors would include “discussions of sexual violence” and “sexual assault”. Titus Andronicus, which the Guardian’s theatre critic Michael Billington described as a “masterly study of the nature of grief”, is widely regarded as Shakespeare’s…

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Stormzy to fund Cambridge scholarships for black students | Education

Stormzy has announced that he is funding two scholarships for black British students to go to Cambridge University. The grime artist will pay the students’ tuition fees as well as a maintenance grant for up to four years of an undergraduate course. Speaking on Thursday at his former school, the Harris City Academy in Croydon, south London, where A-level students were opening their results, Stormzy told BBC Breakfast: “If you’re academically brilliant don’t think because you come from a certain…

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Tate and Steve McQueen call for ‘arts-rich’ school curriculum | Education

Access to the visual arts will be a preserve of privately educated children unless the government takes urgent action to improve the school curriculum, the director of Tate, Maria Balshaw, and the artist Steve McQueen have warned. Tate has joined forces with McQueen and 35 museums and galleries across the country to complain that the curriculum in England is failing children. They are calling for an “arts-rich curriculum” as a “lasting legacy” for McQueen’s hugely popular school photo project which…

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Not Light But Fire How to Lead Meaningful Race Conversation – Education Article

Not Light, But Fire: How to Lead Meaningful Race Conversations in the ClassroomBy Matthew R. Kay(Stenhouse, 2018 – Learn more) Reviewed by Nicole Warchol “Why don’t we have teachers of color in our building?” one of my 7th graders asked me. Even though I am a faculty member on our high school student-run Race Matters Alliance group, I was caught off guard by this question during class and not unprepared to answer it. Conversations about racial inequity are happening: in our students’…

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Does music really help you concentrate? | Education

Many people listen to music while they’re carrying out a task, whether they’re studying for an exam, driving a vehicle or even reading a book. Many of these people argue that background music helps them focus. Why, though? When you think about it, that doesn’t make much sense. Why would having two things to concentrate on make you more focused, not less? Some people even go so far as to say that not having music on is more distracting. So…

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Roger Cardinal obituary | Education

In 1972, Roger Cardinal wrote a book intended to bring to an English-speaking audience the French concept of art brut – literally “raw” or “uncooked” art – a term coined by the painter Jean Dubuffet to describe the work of the neurodiverse, then labelled more baldly as “mad”, eccentric or unworldly. Cardinal’s own preference, as a book title, was to leave the term as it was. “You’ve got art nouveau and art deco,” he reasoned with his publishers, “and now…

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Artemisia Gentileschi’s painting Lucretia sells for almost €4.8m | Art and design

A newly discovered canvas by the female 17th-century Italian painter Artemisia Gentileschi sold for almost €4.8m (£4.1m) on Wednesday, a record for the artist, auction house Artcurial said. The sale came amid a surge of interest in the rare female baroque painter’s extraordinarily dramatic work and easily exceeded the base estimate of between €600,000 and €800,000. The painting, Lucretia, depicts the ancient Roman noblewoman who killed herself after being raped, showing her bare-breasted and about to plunge a dagger into…

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Shakira: ‘I needed surgery – or divine intervention’ | Music

There was a time, in late 2017, when Shakira thought she might never sing again. After suffering a haemorrhage in her vocal cords, she could barely speak. “I always thought there were going to be things in my life that would go away, like beauty, youth, all of that stuff,” she says. “But I never thought that my voice would leave me, because it’s so inherent to my nature. It was my identity. So when I couldn’t sing, that was…

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Big flute discovery and billionaire woes | Brief letters | Education

I was fascinated to read your obituary of Frank Giles (7 November) which contains the following: “His father died when he was 10, leaving the family in straitened circumstances … even so, enough money was found to send Giles to Wellington college.” As the current fees for Wellington seem to be approximately £30,000 per year, and presumably were the equivalent in the 1930s, could we please have the Guardian definition of “straitened circumstances”?Mike HoskinHinton St George, Somerset • My son’s…

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Why boarding schools produce bad leaders | Education

In Britain, the link between private boarding education and leadership is gold-plated. If their parents can afford it, children are sent away from home to walk a well-trodden path that leads straight from boarding school through Oxbridge to high office in institutions such as the judiciary, the army, the City and, especially, government. Our prime minister was only seven when he was sent away to board at Heatherdown preparatory school in Berkshire. Like so many of the men who hold…

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‘It’s in complete crisis’ – architects form trade union amid fury and despair over exploitation | Art and design

Unpaid overtime, precarious contracts, working hours so antisocial your only friends are people who do the same job … after a minimum of seven years’ education and professional training, the reality of working as an architect can be a bleak prospect. It’s not hard to see why so many of them wear black, as if in permanent mourning for the lives they once had. “Spending almost 10 years at uni to be paid £20,000 doesn’t seem right,” says Joseph, a…

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Arts education should not be a luxury, says Julie Hesmondhalgh | Education

Julie Hesmondhalgh, the actor and campaigner, has accused policymakers of conspiring to limit access to arts and culture for British children. Reacting to a report into school provision, Hesmondhalgh told the Observer she was dismayed that arts education was now seen as a luxury. “The idea it is not career-oriented is so wrong. And anyway, what happened to the idea of learning for learning’s sake? It is so depressing.” The Durham Commission on Creativity and Education has called for the…

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Oxford professor accused of selling ancient Bible fragments | Education

An Oxford University professor has been accused of selling ancient Bible fragments to a controversial US company that has been involved in several high-profile scandals related to its aggressive purchases of biblical artefacts. Dirk Obbink, one of the world’s most celebrated classics professors, has been named after an investigation by staff associated with Oxford’s Oxyrhynchus Papyri project. He is accused of selling without permission a number of ancient fragments to the US arts and crafts chain Hobby Lobby. Its owners,…

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