Culture

Students criticise Royal College of Art’s plan to hold degree show online | Education

The Royal College of Art (RCA) is facing a backlash from thousands of students and artists over their decision to make their degree shows online-only for the first time ever due to the coronavirus pandemic. More than 4,500 people, including Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Leckey, have signed a petition calling on the RCA to suspend its programmes and postpone the exhibition until it is safe to return to the college. The students behind the petition, who wish to remain anonymous,…

Read More

Royal College of Music transforms ‘forbidding’ HQ in £40m upgrade | Education

It is one of the world’s great conservatoires, with composer Benjamin Britten and singer Dame Joan Sutherland are among those who trained there. But for decades the Royal College of Music has struggled to showcase its star power and its collection of instruments in headquarters that have been described by some as forbidding and drab. Now, following a £40m transformation – funded in part by donations from artists including the Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli – the RCM is unveiling an…

Read More

Gustav Metzger, pioneer of auto-destructive art, dies aged 90 | Art and design

Gustav Metzger, the inventor of auto-destructive art who spent a lifetime baffling, infuriating and thrilling audiences, as well as influencing generations of younger artists, has died aged 90. A spokeswoman for the artist said he died at his home in London. Metzger was born in Nuremberg to Polish-Jewish parents in 1926 and arrived with his brother in Britain on the Kindertransport in 1939. Much of his immediate family, including his parents, were murdered in the Holocaust. He studied art in…

Read More

Ceri James obituary | Education

My mum, Ceri James, who has died of heart failure aged 72, was a speech and drama teacher. A fine actor, Ceri taught secondary English and drama, and children with special needs at primary level. She had a beautiful singing voice and wonderful diction, plus a gift for languages (she was fluent in French and Welsh). Always glamorous, Ceri loved shoes, jewellery and clothes, but also magnolia trees. She was well travelled and enjoyed exploring new foods and cultures. She…

Read More

Portraits of UK black female professors – in pictures | Education

Phenomenal Women is said to be the first photographic exhibition honouring Britain’s black female professors. It features portraits by Bill Knight of 40 professors across a broad range of subjects. The show will be at London’s City Hall from 18 March until the end of the month Source link

Read More

Instead of rote learning useless facts, children should be taught wellbeing | Alice O’Keeffe | Opinion

In his treatise on the future of humanity, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, the philosopher-historian Yuval Noah Harari offers the young people of today some advice. In order to survive and thrive in adulthood, they should not rely on traditional academic skills such as solving equations or learning computer code. These will soon become obsolete in a world in which computers can perform such techniques more quickly and accurately than humans. All information-based jobs, in fields as diverse as…

Read More

Simon Norton obituary | Education

Simon Norton, who has died of a heart attack aged 66, was a world-class mathematician sometimes mistaken for a homeless man. In the late 1960s he represented Britain at the International Mathematical Olympiads three times, scoring the top grade each time, once with 100%, another time with 99%, and winning a special prize for the elegance of his solutions. What made his work beautiful was not its complexity but its simplicity. Without drafts or false starts, he laid down his…

Read More

‘I was always told I was unusual’: why so few women design video games | Education

There’s a stereotype that women don’t play video games, but it couldn’t be further from the truth. The numbers don’t lie: 52% of gamers were female in the UK’s last major study in 2014. But if we look at the proportion of female workers in the games industry, it’s just 28% in the UK, and roughly 20% worldwide. If so many women are playing games, why are so few making them? The problem lies in the feedback loop of under-representation…

Read More

Shirt worn by Charles I for his execution to go on display in London | Culture

On 30 January 1649, King Charles I of England took to the scaffold outside the Banqueting House in London’s Whitehall. He had requested two shirts to prevent himself from shivering from the cold, a reflex he thought could be mistaken for fear. He knelt in front of the crowd and placed his head on a block. Moments later, the axe fell. Now, 371 years later, the pale blue vest worn by Charles during his execution is to go on display.…

Read More

Oxford don suspended over alleged artefact theft could still gain from sale | Education

An Oxford academic suspected of involvement in the alleged theft of ancient Gospel manuscripts stands to gain from a government appeal to purchase an important artefact for the nation. Dr Dirk Obbink, associate professor in papyrology and Greek at Christ Church, is the owner of the artefact – a unique book dating from around 1414. The arts minister, Helen Whateley, has announced a temporary export bar on the precious Myrowr of Recluses, or “Mirror of Recluses”, a Middle-English volume of…

Read More

Cambridge University issues trigger warnings for Shakespeare lecture | Education

Cambridge students have been given timetables bearing “trigger warnings” to alert them that a lecture on the works of Shakespeare could be upsetting. In the English faculty’s notes on lectures document, students were warned that a lecture discussing the plays Titus Andronicus and The Comedy of Errors would include “discussions of sexual violence” and “sexual assault”. Titus Andronicus, which the Guardian’s theatre critic Michael Billington described as a “masterly study of the nature of grief”, is widely regarded as Shakespeare’s…

Read More

Stormzy to fund Cambridge scholarships for black students | Education

Stormzy has announced that he is funding two scholarships for black British students to go to Cambridge University. The grime artist will pay the students’ tuition fees as well as a maintenance grant for up to four years of an undergraduate course. Speaking on Thursday at his former school, the Harris City Academy in Croydon, south London, where A-level students were opening their results, Stormzy told BBC Breakfast: “If you’re academically brilliant don’t think because you come from a certain…

Read More

Tate and Steve McQueen call for ‘arts-rich’ school curriculum | Education

Access to the visual arts will be a preserve of privately educated children unless the government takes urgent action to improve the school curriculum, the director of Tate, Maria Balshaw, and the artist Steve McQueen have warned. Tate has joined forces with McQueen and 35 museums and galleries across the country to complain that the curriculum in England is failing children. They are calling for an “arts-rich curriculum” as a “lasting legacy” for McQueen’s hugely popular school photo project which…

Read More

Not Light But Fire How to Lead Meaningful Race Conversation – Education Article

Not Light, But Fire: How to Lead Meaningful Race Conversations in the ClassroomBy Matthew R. Kay(Stenhouse, 2018 – Learn more) Reviewed by Nicole Warchol “Why don’t we have teachers of color in our building?” one of my 7th graders asked me. Even though I am a faculty member on our high school student-run Race Matters Alliance group, I was caught off guard by this question during class and not unprepared to answer it. Conversations about racial inequity are happening: in our students’…

Read More

Does music really help you concentrate? | Education

Many people listen to music while they’re carrying out a task, whether they’re studying for an exam, driving a vehicle or even reading a book. Many of these people argue that background music helps them focus. Why, though? When you think about it, that doesn’t make much sense. Why would having two things to concentrate on make you more focused, not less? Some people even go so far as to say that not having music on is more distracting. So…

Read More

Roger Cardinal obituary | Education

In 1972, Roger Cardinal wrote a book intended to bring to an English-speaking audience the French concept of art brut – literally “raw” or “uncooked” art – a term coined by the painter Jean Dubuffet to describe the work of the neurodiverse, then labelled more baldly as “mad”, eccentric or unworldly. Cardinal’s own preference, as a book title, was to leave the term as it was. “You’ve got art nouveau and art deco,” he reasoned with his publishers, “and now…

Read More