Business

‘The MIT of the north’: how the government plans to transform ex-mining towns | Education

In 1984, police and striking miners fought at the coking plant at Orgreave, South Yorkshire, in one of the most violent and pivotal clashes in British industrial history. Today, Orgreave is the site of another battle, one that may determine the fate of the government’s plan to build an “MIT of the north”. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private research university world-famous for turning its cutting-edge research into the spinouts, skilled jobs and cold hard cash that…

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Blam! Dennis the Menace and Roger the Dodger to teach British pupils about money | Business

Dennis the Menace and the Bash Street Kids could soon be teaching primary children how to manage their pocket money, thanks to an educational tie-up involving the Bank of England and Beano comics. A 12-lesson course on financial literacy, called Money and Me, will be introduced to English, Scottish and Welsh school curriculums from July, teaching children between the ages of five and 11 the basics of money and how the economy works. The lessons, a collaboration between the Beano,…

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Schools angered by holiday firm’s failure to refund cancelled trips | Education

An adventure holiday firm is facing a furious backlash and the threat of a boycott for failing to refund thousands of cancelled school trips. Teachers, parents and those representing education providers have lined up in recent days to condemn PGL, which has provided a host of school trips both in the UK and abroad since 1957. But with overnight stays and all foreign travel banned in the UK, and many schools still closed to large numbers of pupils, all trips…

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Working mothers interrupted more often than fathers in lockdown – study | Gender pay gap

Working mothers have been able to do only one hour of uninterrupted paid work for every three hours done by men during lockdown, according to a study that exposes the work imbalance between men and women.  A report from the Institute for Fiscal Studies and the UCL institute of education also says mothers in England are more likely than fathers to have lost their jobs during lockdown, increasing fears that the coronavirus crisis has exacerbated inequality and could lead to…

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Without more federal funds, half of all child care centers could close forever – Education Article

A child plays outside at a child care center in Texas. Experts caution an estimated 50 percent of licensed child care centers in the nation are at risk of closing permanently if the federal government does not provide more funding. Photo: Jackie Mader/The Hechinger Report As the days of a national shutdown stretched on, Aliya Johnson-Roberts knew she would have to start cutting employees’ hours and laying off some of her staff. When her child care center in northeast Philadelphia…

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Transport after coronavirus: how will we fly, drive, commute and ride? | Australia news

Before the pandemic struck, Sara Blazey made the same three-hour commute to work, three days a week, for the better part of 12 years. The 63-year-old family lawyer from the Blue Mountains works for a domestic violence legal advice hotline in Parramatta and it used to be that she would wake at 7am, drive seven minutes to Hazelbrook station and from there catch the 7.17am train to Parramatta before making the same one-and-a-half hour trip home in the evening. With…

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Work after coronavirus: how will it change when the lockdown is over? | Australia news

As Australia surveys the labour market wreckage of almost two months of pandemic-inspired physical isolation, several orthodoxies have emerged about the way we will work when the restrictions are eventually lifted. One, based partly on a history that illustrates many jobs lost in big downturns never reappear, is that Australia faces entrenched unemployment upwards of 10% for at least half a decade. Another is that some sort of “new normal” will emerge whereby vast sections of workers will continue to…

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Manchester University braced for losses of more than £270m | Education

The vice-chancellor of the University of Manchester has said the institution faces losses in excess of £270m next year if students cancel their studies because of the coronavirus pandemic. Prof Dame Nancy Rothwell told staff that job losses and pay cuts might be required, along with “rapid and radical changes to our university and the way we operate”. Her stark assessment came after a report from the University and College Union (UCU) forecast that the sector could lose about £2.5bn…

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Councillor’s ‘oven-ready’ scheme to force private schools to pay their bit | Education

When councillor Libby Lisgo visits one of the most deprived estates in Taunton, in her ward of Priorswood, she can see the fence of Taunton school, one of the area’s famous independent schools. “While we are struggling to raise funds to take local residents on rare day trips, I can see a fleet of minibuses on the other side of that fence, sitting idle,” she says. “And I can’t help thinking: ‘Gosh, if only we could access those from time…

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The true value of higher education | Letter | Education

Hot on the heels of a report by the rightwing thinktank Policy Exchange arguing that “universities have lost the trust of the nation” comes research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies that says “One in five students would be financially better off if they skipped higher education” (Report, 29 February). Putting aside the IFS’s focus – and that of your article – on the fact that one-fifth of students don’t benefit financially from earning a degree, rather than on the…

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Schools trial body cameras to aid safety and monitor behaviour | Education

Schools in England are equipping teachers with body cameras to monitor pupil behaviour and improve safeguarding, as part of a trial that could lead to them being deployed on a permanent basis. At least two state secondary schools, one in London and one in Hampshire, said they have been impressed by the operation of the body cameras – lightweight versions of those worn by police – and hope to retain them. Larry Davis, the deputy headteacher of Southfields academy in…

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UK firms demand shake-up of ‘inflexible’ apprenticeship system | Education

Business leaders are demanding a shake-up of the UK apprenticeship system, after official figures suggest the government will miss its target for new apprentices. As National Apprenticeship Week gets underway on Monday, business groups are calling for changes to the system to give small businesses desperately-needed funding so they can take on and train more apprentices. Small firms play a critical role, as they offer nine out of 10 apprenticeships for 16- to 24-year-olds, according to the Federation of Small…

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Flawed thinking behind school isolation booths | Letters | Education

There would be an argument in favour of the use of isolation rooms or cubicles for troublesome young people in school if there was any evidence that they worked (Alarm as more schools use ‘degrading’ isolation booths, 18 January). In fact there appears to be no such evidence. The evidence that we do have is that teachers who use praised-based strategies to improve pupils’ behaviour in class experience far fewer disruptive incidents and hence less need to be punitive. Yes,…

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‘Guys ask for more money’: why female-led startups underperform | Education

The first time Olivia Champion pitched a business idea based on her academic research was so disheartening she nearly gave up. The 10-strong panel she faced were all men, bar a few women responsible for administration and taking minutes. Their first question was: “Why are you here?” “It took the wind out of my sails immediately,” she says. “I thought, ‘Blimey. This is going badly.’” She had been convinced her idea was good, but after that rejection she began to…

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Why we need to blow a Raspberry at big tech… | John Naughton | Education

I’m writing this on my nice new Raspberry Pi. If you’re not a geek, this may suggest a columnist who has lost what remains of his marbles. But rest assured: I am not joking. The Pi is a fully functioning credit-card sized computer running a modern version of the Linux operating system. I bought it as a Christmas treat – and also as a project. The total cost – for the latest version, with 4GB of ram – was £114.…

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Economists Ate My School – Why Defining Teaching as a Transaction is Destroying Our Society – Education Article

    Teaching is one of the most misunderstood interactions in the world.     Some people see it as a mere transaction, a job: you do this, I’ll pay you that.     The input is your salary. The output is learning.    These are distinctly measurable phenomena. One is calculated in dollars and cents. The other in academic outcomes, usually standardized test scores. The higher the salary, the more valued the teacher. The higher the test scores, the…

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