Business

Councillor’s ‘oven-ready’ scheme to force private schools to pay their bit | Education

When councillor Libby Lisgo visits one of the most deprived estates in Taunton, in her ward of Priorswood, she can see the fence of Taunton school, one of the area’s famous independent schools. “While we are struggling to raise funds to take local residents on rare day trips, I can see a fleet of minibuses on the other side of that fence, sitting idle,” she says. “And I can’t help thinking: ‘Gosh, if only we could access those from time…

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The true value of higher education | Letter | Education

Hot on the heels of a report by the rightwing thinktank Policy Exchange arguing that “universities have lost the trust of the nation” comes research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies that says “One in five students would be financially better off if they skipped higher education” (Report, 29 February). Putting aside the IFS’s focus – and that of your article – on the fact that one-fifth of students don’t benefit financially from earning a degree, rather than on the…

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Schools trial body cameras to aid safety and monitor behaviour | Education

Schools in England are equipping teachers with body cameras to monitor pupil behaviour and improve safeguarding, as part of a trial that could lead to them being deployed on a permanent basis. At least two state secondary schools, one in London and one in Hampshire, said they have been impressed by the operation of the body cameras – lightweight versions of those worn by police – and hope to retain them. Larry Davis, the deputy headteacher of Southfields academy in…

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UK firms demand shake-up of ‘inflexible’ apprenticeship system | Education

Business leaders are demanding a shake-up of the UK apprenticeship system, after official figures suggest the government will miss its target for new apprentices. As National Apprenticeship Week gets underway on Monday, business groups are calling for changes to the system to give small businesses desperately-needed funding so they can take on and train more apprentices. Small firms play a critical role, as they offer nine out of 10 apprenticeships for 16- to 24-year-olds, according to the Federation of Small…

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Flawed thinking behind school isolation booths | Letters | Education

There would be an argument in favour of the use of isolation rooms or cubicles for troublesome young people in school if there was any evidence that they worked (Alarm as more schools use ‘degrading’ isolation booths, 18 January). In fact there appears to be no such evidence. The evidence that we do have is that teachers who use praised-based strategies to improve pupils’ behaviour in class experience far fewer disruptive incidents and hence less need to be punitive. Yes,…

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‘Guys ask for more money’: why female-led startups underperform | Education

The first time Olivia Champion pitched a business idea based on her academic research was so disheartening she nearly gave up. The 10-strong panel she faced were all men, bar a few women responsible for administration and taking minutes. Their first question was: “Why are you here?” “It took the wind out of my sails immediately,” she says. “I thought, ‘Blimey. This is going badly.’” She had been convinced her idea was good, but after that rejection she began to…

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Why we need to blow a Raspberry at big tech… | John Naughton | Education

I’m writing this on my nice new Raspberry Pi. If you’re not a geek, this may suggest a columnist who has lost what remains of his marbles. But rest assured: I am not joking. The Pi is a fully functioning credit-card sized computer running a modern version of the Linux operating system. I bought it as a Christmas treat – and also as a project. The total cost – for the latest version, with 4GB of ram – was £114.…

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Economists Ate My School – Why Defining Teaching as a Transaction is Destroying Our Society – Education Article

    Teaching is one of the most misunderstood interactions in the world.     Some people see it as a mere transaction, a job: you do this, I’ll pay you that.     The input is your salary. The output is learning.    These are distinctly measurable phenomena. One is calculated in dollars and cents. The other in academic outcomes, usually standardized test scores. The higher the salary, the more valued the teacher. The higher the test scores, the…

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Millions spent on ‘fake’ apprenticeships, says report | Education

Hundreds of millions of pounds are being spent on “fake apprenticeships” that are just relabelled degrees or training courses, according to a report by a thinktank which says employers are abusing the current system. Since 2017 large companies have been forced to set aside the equivalent of 0.5% of their payroll to fund apprenticeships. But according to Tom Richmond, the author of a report for the EDSK thinktank, many are instead using the funds for existing professional development courses. “Despite…

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Adults in training plunge to record low in a decade | Education

The number of adults who have improved their skills with some form of training has plunged by 4 million over the past decade to the lowest level on record, as government cuts threaten to drive up inequality and damage the economy. In a warning that a decade of decline would undermine the life chances of millions and pave the way for weaker economic growth in future, the Learning and Work Institute said the number of adults taking part in learning…

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Universities are failing to address the UK’s skills shortage | Letter | Education

The growth of financial incentives, lower entry requirements, unconditional offers and spurious advertising (Don’t mislead to attract students, says regulator, 19 December) is further evidence of a marketised higher education system that is not properly serving the interests of students nor the country as a whole. The product of this approach is the large proportion of university leavers going into jobs that don’t require a degree, one of the highest rates in Europe, while at the same time the UK…

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9 reasons to attend FETC 2020 – Education Article

Educators from around the world are gearing up for the Future of Education Technology Conference (FETC) in Miami, Florida, on January 14-17, 2020. What’s more, it’s the 40th anniversary of the conference. Whether you’re a third-grade teacher, an IT director, a special education administrator, or in charge of district innovation, you’ll find plenty to see and do. From sessions and workshops to hands-on demos and an Expo Hall filled with products from more than 400 companies, FETC is a can’t-miss…

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Student buildings still covered in Grenfell-style cladding | Society

Thousands of students arriving at university for freshers’ week face sleeping in high-rise accommodation wrapped in combustible Grenfell-style cladding, the government has admitted. Fifty-four privately owned student residential towers in England remain clad in aluminium composite material similar to that which helped spread the fire at Grenfell Tower 15 months ago, claiming 72 lives. The extent of the problem was revealed in figures released on Thursday by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government. Only eight of the 62…

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‘It’s in complete crisis’ – architects form trade union amid fury and despair over exploitation | Art and design

Unpaid overtime, precarious contracts, working hours so antisocial your only friends are people who do the same job … after a minimum of seven years’ education and professional training, the reality of working as an architect can be a bleak prospect. It’s not hard to see why so many of them wear black, as if in permanent mourning for the lives they once had. “Spending almost 10 years at uni to be paid £20,000 doesn’t seem right,” says Joseph, a…

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Special needs children are being failed | Letters | Education

This is the most damning select committee report I’ve ever read (Children with special needs plunged into ‘nightmare of bureaucracy’, 23 October). Line after line, it shows that the education system for disabled children is completely broken. Parents are forced to become protesters, lawyers and bureaucrats to stand any sort of chance of getting the support their child is legally entitled to. The government now has a golden opportunity to carry out a root and branch review of the system,…

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Minister orders summit with developers over student homes delay | Education

The universities minister has called a summit to address the problem of unfinished student accommodation, which has resulted in hundreds of undergraduates having to find last-minute temporary housing at the start of the new term. Chris Skidmore is to meet representatives from private developers providing student accommodation as well as universities after it emerged that freshers have had to be rehoused – some up to 30 miles away – because their promised accommodation was not ready. The minister said the…

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