No-deal Brexit would leave science dead for years, say Nobel prizewinners | Education

Two Nobel laureates and other top scientists are accusing Boris Johnson of destroying Britain’s global reputation by behaving “like a clown” and pursuing a no-deal Brexit that would leave UK science “dead” for years. The government has assured anxious academics it still has a clear ambition to join the European commission’s new €100bn (£89bn) research funding programme, Horizon Europe, after Brexit. But Robert-Jan Smits, the commission’s former director-general of research, says the UK has “zero chance” of negotiating associate membership…

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Universities brace for Brexit protests as students flex muscles | Education

Unprecedented levels of student activism are set to erupt this month when angry students, fed up with the turmoil around Brexit, arrive for freshers’ week, student unions say. This term sees the arrival at university of three whole years’ worth of students – first, second and third years – who were too young to vote in the European referendum in 2016. Latest polling suggests students would be more likely to vote in an election now than at any time in…

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Politically literate citizens seem to be a problem for Michael Gove | Laura McInerney | Education

From the vast compendium of Michael Gove’s arrogant moments as education secretary one has been on my mind these last few weeks. He was never a fan of citizenship as a subject – the one that teaches children the rules of democracy – and, once in office, set out to slim the curriculum and get rid of “political fads”. You know, such as teaching young people the rules politicians must follow even when their plans are fading in front of…

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‘We’re confused, angry and anxious over Brexit … and so are the children we teach’ | Education

Ed Finch, teacher, Larkrise primary school, OxfordThere’s another general election coming and I am sick to my stomach at the thought of how I’ll discuss that in class or in assembly. How can I present, in a balanced and non-judgmental way, the appalling invective that has been normalised these last few weeks? How can I suggest to pupils that adults who posture, threaten, lie and break the law are worthy of our respect? We are required to teach “British values”…

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Teachers feel they are ‘punchbags’ for parents over Brexit | Education

Teachers are being “used as punchbags” for families to vent their frustration over Brexit, schools have warned. Teachers have told the Observer they are experiencing a wave of confrontations with angry and anxious parents, while pupils as young as six are coming into school scared and confused. Over the past year schools have started discussing Brexit in classrooms and assemblies as teachers seek to reduce tensions in the playground and reassure children who may have misunderstood what they have seen…

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Parents complain over pro-Boris Johnson clips played in schools | Education

A company that rents digital message boards to schools said it has removed a series of slides featuring Boris Johnson after complaints from parents. The slides, showing a brief biography of Johnson – including one stating “He wants to unite the UK” – were raised in the House of Commons by Stella Creasy, the Labour MP for Walthamstow, in north-east London, after parents in her constituency complained on social media about seeing the images at a local primary school. Phil…

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Foreign language learning more vital than ever in post-Brexit world | Letters | Education

The fall in the number of pupils studying modern foreign languages (MFL) is concerning and continues a trend started when the government of the day removed the compulsion for our young people to study a language to age 16 back in the 90s (Learn a language? No need for them once we quit the EU, parents tell schools, 3 May). Languages are an essential part of a broad, balanced curriculum. Not only do they provide an opportunity to communicate more…

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Brexit ‘putting pupils off modern foreign languages’ | Education

The aftermath of Brexit and the difficulty of new GCSE and A-level exams have combined to put off young people from studying modern foreign languages (MFL) at school, according to a new report by the British Council. While more than two-thirds of teachers surveyed by the British Council said the difficulty of the exams was causing concern, one in four said Brexit had “cast a pall” over pupils learning any foreign languages, with some parents actively discouraging their children. Teachers…

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Brexit ‘may bar UK scientists from €100bn EU research fund’ | Education

One of Britain’s leading researchers has warned of a “major blow” to national science if ministers cannot secure access to a massive research programme that is being drawn up by the EU. The Horizon Europe programme will fund €100bn in research projects, making it one of the largest science funds in the world. British researchers will be locked out unless the government negotiates an access deal in the coming months. Sir Paul Nurse, the Nobel prize-winning director of the Francis…

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EU students will not face Brexit penalty next year | Education

EU students going to English universities next year will be eligible for domestic tuition fees and student loans for the duration of their course regardless of Brexit, the Department for Education (DfE) has announced. Chris Skidmore, the universities minister, told a meeting of ministers in Brussels that EU students would continue to be funded on the same basis as students in England for undergraduate and postgraduate courses starting in the 2020-21 academic year. “We know that students will be considering…

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‘It was a no-brainer’: but does a degree from abroad really make a difference? | Education

Adam Hussain was about to go to university in 2013 when tuition fees in the UK nearly trebled to £9,000. With additional loans for living costs, he realised he would incur debts of £40,000. So when he saw a television report about an exodus of UK students to the Netherlands, Hussain decided to attend an open day at Maastricht University, where annual fees were €2,000 (then about £1,700). That year more than 1,000 British freshers started university in the Netherlands.…

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England’s schools face staffing crisis as EU teachers stay at home | Education – Education Article

The number of teachers from the EU wanting to work in England has slumped in the past year, with fears that Brexit will exacerbate staff shortages and hit language learning. Teachers from EU countries applying for the right to work in English schools fell by a quarter in a single year, according to official data. There were 3,525 people from member states awarded qualified teacher status (QTS) in 2017-18, which allows them to work in most state and special schools.…

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