books

‘Let your kids get bored’: emergency advice from teachers on schooling at home | Education

School may have closed for the foreseeable future, and all exams cancelled, but children still need to be educated and entertained – as well as reassured. Many schools plan to send work home and there are lots of free resources available via online platforms such as BBC Teach. But meanwhile, how do you even start home learning when this is all so new? We asked teachers for their emergency advice. Parents of primary children Prioritise your child’s wellbeing “Great learning…

Read More

Auditing Your Read Aloud – A Whole School Conversation – Pernille Ripp – Education Article

In 2010, I created a project called The Global Read Aloud, for the past 11 years I have been the driving force behind this global literacy initiative. For 11 years, I have asked educators to recommend books for us to read aloud on a global scale. To suggest books they feel would make for an incredible connection around the world. That will inspire students to learn more about others. That will inspire students to learn more about themselves. That will…

Read More

6 Great Books for Spring Break – Education Article

Time to Read and Relax! Teachers! Spring break is just ahead, we promise. In celebration of this momentous occasion, we’d like to offer our reading recommendations for your consideration as you:  1) Visit the restroom any time you want.  2) Drink coffee in your PJ’s (all day long if you so choose).  3) Grade nothing and create zero lesson plans.   4) Binge watch your favorite shows.  5) Rest, rejuvenate and relax, oh, and of course read! 

Read More

Simon Norton obituary | Education

Simon Norton, who has died of a heart attack aged 66, was a world-class mathematician sometimes mistaken for a homeless man. In the late 1960s he represented Britain at the International Mathematical Olympiads three times, scoring the top grade each time, once with 100%, another time with 99%, and winning a special prize for the elegance of his solutions. What made his work beautiful was not its complexity but its simplicity. Without drafts or false starts, he laid down his…

Read More

A High Five For All Of Us – Pernille Ripp – Education Article

I’m on the road again. February seems to have been a long list of travel. Of packing up the suitcase and saying goodbye to those at home, to the kids in my classroom. Sometimes that is the reality of what I do. It is hard, but worth it. This week has been one filled with the worry that you get when one of your own children is sick. When they are up for hours at night with a fever so…

Read More

Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Yesterday morning I listened to a fantastic World Affairs (@world_affairs) podcast interview with UC Irvine professor, historian, and author Jeff Wasserstrom (@jwassers) by MaryKay Magistad (@MaryKayMagistad). Dr. Wasserstrom is the author of “Vigil: Hong Kong on the Brink” from February 2020, which was also the title of the interview from February 5, 2020. Dr. Wasserstrom also published “China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs To Know” in 2013. When I shared a link via Twitter to this recent World…

Read More

David Gribble obituary | Education

My husband, David Gribble, who has died aged 87, was for many years a language teacher at Dartington Hall, Devon, a progressive boarding school, where he was a strong advocate of student-centred learning. He wrote several books on his philosophy of teaching, which was that “for most children progressive methods of education work better than conventional ones”. His published works included Real Education: Varieties of Freedom (1998), Lifelines (2004) and Children Don’t Start Wars (2010). Sadly for David, after almost…

Read More

Ways to Support Student Writers With & Without Technology – Education Article

There are so many ways to support student writers in your classroom. Whether you’re working with first graders or first-year high school students, there are strategies that support students — both with and without technology. In this blog post, I’m so excited to share some actionable strategies for classrooms looking to balance digital tools with “analog” experiences. A few years ago, I met Michele Haiken at an EdCamp in New York. We connected earlier this year again at the FETC…

Read More

Brian Lee obituary | Education

iMy friend and former colleague Brian Lee, who has died aged 87, was a leading figure in the development of American studies in the UK, setting up the American studies department at the University of Nottingham in 1977. His published works included The Novels of Henry James: A Study of Culture and Consciousness (1978), Hollywood (1986) and American Fiction: 1865-1940 (1987). Born in Bispham, near Blackpool, to Leonard, a civil servant, and his wife, Ethel, who ran a B&B, Brian…

Read More

Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

For the past three years, I’ve had the opportunity to partner with our high school English department chair, Whitney Finley, who teaches a unique and engaging creative writing class for 12th graders in which they write and publish their own children’s picture books. After creating their books, as a group students visit our Kindergarten students and share their books with them in person. Later in the year, Kindergarten students create their own books, and then have an opportunity to share…

Read More

A Few Favorite Books from Our Classroom for Teens Who Say They Can’t Find a Great Book – Pernille Ripp – Education Article

One of the many benefits there is from being an educator who reads a lot is that I get to create many different reading lists in my head. From the child that asks me to find another book just like the one they just read, to the colleague who needs some books to take their mind off of bigger things, to the child who tells me that they have never liked a single book, there are lists in my head…

Read More

‘It happens to real people’: how to help children grasp the horror of the Holocaust | Michael Rosen | Education

As a very young child, the only inkling I had of the Holocaust was that every now and then my father would say that he’d had two uncles in France who were “there before the war and weren’t there afterwards”. I’d wonder, how could they have just disappeared? How could there only be a nothing? At weddings and wider family gatherings, we would meet his cousin Michael and later we would be told that Michael had been “put on a…

Read More

Jasper Griffin obituary | Books

The classicist Jasper Griffin, who has died aged 82 of pneumonia, is best known for his work on the Iliad and the Odyssey, ancient Greek epic poems that deal with the Trojan war and its aftermath and are traditionally attributed to Homer. Crucial to Griffin’s work, which helped bridge a gulf between anglophone and continental European scholarship, was a paradoxical situation in which Homer had found himself. In antiquity, Homer, who was sometimes thought to have lived around 800 BC,…

Read More

Karl Meyer obituary | Education

My friend Karl Meyer, who has died aged 91, was a journalist for the Washington Post and the New York Times from the 1950s until the late 90s. An adventurous reporter, he covered the Soviet Union’s invasion of Czechoslovakia, Fidel Castro’s revolution in Cuba and the failed Bay of Pigs invasion there, about which he wrote a book, The Cuban Invasion: The Chronicle of a Disaster (1962), with a fellow journalist, Tad Szulc. I first got to know Karl in…

Read More

Best Books of 2019 – Education Article

In June, I published my Best Books of 2019 So Far list, the very next day after publishing it, I read an incredible book, and then another, and then another. And so as it happens, the list continues, here are all of the incredible books that I loved in 2019. I know I missed some so please let me know your favorites as well. And I know the year is not over yet, and so this list will inevitably be…

Read More