Assessment

Resourceaholic: 5 Maths Gems #100 – Education Article

Welcome to my 100th gems post! This is a big milestone for me. I’ve published 327 posts since I started writing my blog four and a half years ago. One hundred of those posts have been part of my ‘Maths Gems’ series – each one has featured a selection of news, ideas and resources for maths teachers. When I joined Twitter I couldn’t believe how many ideas and resources were being shared by maths teachers everyday that weren’t being seen by…

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Improving Organizational Culture: Discovering Your Core Strengths – Education Article

We believe that a positive organizational culture can take an organization from good to great. Given the importance of developing healthy leadership and organizations, we have been sharing a few of the tips our team has learned over the years. In our last post, we discussed the importance of finding your personal and organizational why. This is a great reflection exercise for teams to do to keep ever present the reasons why they are embarking upon their work. Reaffirming why…

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How Kids Really Learn @coolcatteacher – Education Article

How do kids learn and remember? Teacher Andrew Stadel, @mr_stadel founder of the popular site estimation180.com, talks about this pursuit of learning in the classroom. This topic is his summer research topic. As you ponder the classroom, look at what you’ll research to become a better teacher. Urkund: Today’s Sponsor Urkund is great as a plagiarism prevention tool and connects with most common Learning Management Systems like Google Classroom, Moodle, and Canvas or as a stand-alone web tool or by…

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Comparative Assessment In The Classroom – Education Article

Reading Time: 2 minutes What is comparative assessment and how can teachers use it in their classroom? Psychologist, Louis Thurstone, published a paper on the law of comparative judgment in 1927! Thurstone’s method of comparative judgement exploits the power of adaptivity; in scoring rather than testing. There has been a recent and welcome revival of comparative assessment, but it has been around for a long time and one could argue that we are 90 years too late. With an influx…

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Why We Should Test English Language Learners in their Home Language – Education Article

By: Adam Withycombe A parent makes the time and musters the courage to come and see you. They’re here, in your classroom, hoping for good news about their child, or at least a path forward from challenges and trouble spots. But you have to look them in the eye and tell them you have nothing—no data, no test results, no insights into how their child is performing. It’s not that their child doesn’t know anything. Just the opposite. You don’t…

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Rubric Repair: 5 Changes that Get Results – Education Article

Listen to my interview with Mark Wise (transcript): Sponsored by Pear Deck and Microsoft Teams for Education   In my 20-year career as an administrator, I’ve had the opportunity to be a fly on the wall in hundreds of classrooms across grade levels and content areas. While much has changed in education over those years, one element has remained constant: the well-intentioned use of rubrics with varying levels of success. Starting with their use as early as kindergarten and continuing…

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A Simple Trick for Success with One-Pagers – Education Article

Listen to my interview with Betsy Potash (transcript): Sponsored by Chill Expeditions and Kiddom   Have you heard the whispers about one-pagers in the online teacher hallways? The concept of a one-pager, in which students share their most important takeaways on a single piece of blank paper, has really taken off recently.   The one-pagers I see on Instagram draw me in like a slice of double chocolate mousse cake. The artistry students bring to representing their texts on a…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Last week I had an opportunity to attend the LLI Southwest Conference at The Oakridge School in Arlington, Texas, and present with two of our second grade teachers about our “Seesaw Skills iPad Pilot Project,” which I’m leading this year with teachers in our Lower Division at Casady School in Oklahoma City. In this post, I’ll share a few reflections from those experiences, as well as links to the recorded audio of our presentation and our presentation slides. You can…

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Investing in Innovation: Where’s the Federal Support? – Education Article

By: Arthur VanderVeen Educators and policy leaders might be forgiven for not often turning to the Federal Register for inspiration. But buried there in the ESSA regulations is a truly inspired effort to resolve one of the most vexing tensions shaping our national discussion on the role of assessment: the Innovative Assessment Demonstration Authority (IADA) pilot. The IADA invites up to seven states to develop innovative, next-generation assessments that better support student-centered learning, including competency-based assessments, instructionally embedded assessments, interim…

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The learning assessment market: pointers for countries – part 2 – Education Article

By Silvia Montoya, Director, UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS) and Luis Crouch, Senior Economist, RTI International [1] In a previous blog, we argued that the market for learning assessment is very inefficient and therefore warrants public action. As things stand: More than half of countries do not participate in a cross-national assessment, makes it hard for them and for the international community to benchmark their progress towards the learning outcome indicators in SDG 4. Countries that may want to participate in a…

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The madness of flight paths – David Didau – Education Article

Schools are desperate to find ways to predict students’ progress from year to year and between key stages. Seemingly, the most common approach to solving this problem is to produce some sort of ‘flight path’. The internet is full of such misguided attempts to do the impossible. Predicting a students’ progress is a mug’s game. It can’t be done. At the level of nationally representative population sample we can estimate the likelihood of someone who is measured at performing at…

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How to Assure Summative Assessments Are Fair and Equitable – Education Article

A MiddleWeb Blog My husband began his career as an automotive engineer. I can remember his excitement when we would pass a vehicle on the road and he would tell me, “That one has my (insert name of part) on it.” This always impressed me because it was concrete evidence that something he did succeeded and had meaning. However, I can also remember the days when he and his team would do testing on a part they had designed, and…

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Assessing Your Assessment Methods | Atlas – Education Article

By Megan Davenport, Professional Development Specialist How often do you take a moment to reflect on the different types of assessments your students experience? Everyone has their go-to assessments, and busy teaching days don’t offer much time (or mental capacity) to step back and reflect. However, when we do have time to think strategically about our curriculum, we want relevant and helpful information to make the most of our conversations. The reports in Atlas can serve as a conversation starter…

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How do we know pupils are making progress? Part 3: Assessment – David Didau – Education Article

In Part 1 of this series I set out the problems with making predictions about students’ progress by drawing a ‘flight path’ between KS2 and KS4, then, in Part 2, I explained how thinking about the curriculum as a progression model is essential in making judgments about whether students are making progress. In this post we will turn our attention to issues of assessment. NB. This might feel a bit technical at times, but please know that I’m trying hard to…

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Dear STAR Test, We Need to Talk Again… – Pernille Ripp – Education Article

Three years ago, almost to this date, I wrote my first blog post about the STAR test, a test sold by Renaissance Learning and employed in thousands of districts across the United States. That post started a discussion with the people behind STAR and while I wish I could say that it created change, isn’t that after all what we always hope for, it didn’t. Three years later, on the eve of my final STAR reading test of the year,…

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(SPAG) Tests: Spelling, Punctuation And Grammar – Education Article

(SPAG) Tests: Spelling, Punctuation And Grammar | TeacherToolkit 14th May 201914th May 2019 @TeacherToolkit 52 Views Committee for Linguistics in Education, Department for Education, Grammar, Key Stage 1, Key Stage 2, Lancaster University, Memory, National Curriculum, Punctuation, SATs, Testing, vocabulary, Willem B. Hollmann, Year 2 Reading Time: 3 minutes Are teachers supported by the Department for Education to deliver primary tests? In the run-up to SATs, I was contacted by Willem B. Hollmann, Lancaster University from his work with the…

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