Academics

As an academic, should I worry about my conference carbon footprint? | Sophia Kier-Byfield | Education

The other day, as I boarded a budget airline plane to attend a conference in Spain, I was overcome with a feeling I’ve come to recognise: carbon-footprint guilt. As a PhD student, this would be my first international conference, an exciting chance to meet fellow researchers in my field – feminism and gender studies – and discuss topics we care about. But as I sat chatting casually with other academics headed the same way, I couldn’t help but worry about…

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Cutting tuition fees misses the point. We need to overhaul the whole system | Matt Waddup | Education

There are lots of good proposals in today’s Augar review of post-18 education and funding in England, including the restoration of maintenance grants for the poorest students, new funding opportunities for adult learners, and the expansion of further education colleges. Yet its downfall is that it fundamentally fails to grapple with the contradictions at the core of our marketised education system. As such, it gets some big calls wrong. For starters, the review correctly notes the plight of further education…

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Sonita Alleyne to be first black leader of an Oxbridge college | Education

A businesswoman is to become the first black leader of an Oxbridge college after she was elected master of Jesus College, Cambridge. Sonita Alleyne will also be the first female head in the history of the college, which was founded in 1496, when she takes up the role from 1 October. The 51-year-old entrepreneur, who has previously served as a BBC trustee and chairs the British Board of Film Classification, described her election as an honour. Alleyne was brought up…

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Video games can turn university graduates into better employees | Matthew Barr | Education

In recent years, Boris Johnson has excelled at making ignorant pronouncements and illiterate blunders. From offensive remarks on burqas to reciting Kipling in Myanmar and his ludicrous statements on Brexit, Johnson has perfected the art of getting it wrong. It feels like he’s managed to offend just about everyone. For video game educators like myself, that moment arrived way back in 2006, when Johnson attacked video games as a learning tool. “They [young people] become like blinking lizards, motionless, absorbed,…

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